Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM)

Vaccines Causing Multiple Sclerosis Nurse Sues Over H1N1 Shot

Court Awards 63 Million to Vaccine Brain Damaged Victims

Flu Shot Causing Brain Disorders & Paralysis
Stepping to the edge of a giant precipice overlooking the medical mayhem and inoculation ineptitudes that have castigated our health and propagate our perceptions, a paralyzing revelation rises to the surface of the ongoing vaccination population reduction program known as immunizations. The H1N1 vaccination is the toxic injection connected to the new spike in the occurrence of Guillain-Barré syndrome a paralyzing nervous disorder in which the body’s immune system begins to attack itself. A new study out of the Lancet shows conclusive evidence that these cases of Guillain-Barré syndrome have been caused by the 2009 H1N1 Flu vaccination.

Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM)
Overview
Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a brief but intense attack of inflammation (swelling) in the brain and spinal cord and occasionally the optic nerves that damages the brain’s myelin (the white coating of nerve fibers). Other terms used to refer to ADEM include post-infectious encephalomyelitis and immune-mediated encephalomyelitis.
ADEM is sometimes difficult to distinguish from multiple sclerosis (MS) because the symptoms common to both “demyelinating” disorders include loss of vision, weakness, numbness and loss of balance. Both ADEM and MS involve immune-mediated responses to myelin in the brain and spinal cord.
What causes ADEM?
The cause of ADEM is not clear but in more than half of the cases, symptoms appear following a viral or bacterial infection, usually a sore throat or cough and very rarely following vaccination. ADEM is thought to be an autoimmune condition where the body’s immune system mistakenly identifies its own healthy cells and tissues as foreign and mounts an attack against them. This attack results in inflammation.  Most cases of ADEM begin about 7 to 14 days after an infection or up to three months following a vaccination. In some cases of ADEM, no preceding event is identified.
Who gets ADEM, and when?
Although ADEM can appear at any age, children are more likely than adults to develop it. More than 80 percent of childhood cases occur in patients younger than 10 years. Most of the remaining cases occur between the ages of 10 and 20 but ADEM is sometimes (rarely) diagnosed in adults. ADEM is thought to affect 1 in every 125,000 to 250,000 individuals in a given year. Five percent of these cases could be associated with vaccination.

ADEM TRIGGERED BY A VACCINE
Compensation is Available Through the Vaccine Injury Court
Can ADEM be Triggered by a Vaccine?
Yes. Viral infection or vaccination can trigger ADEM. ADEM is sometimes diagnosed as a severe first attack of multiple sclerosis (MS) since some of the symptoms of the two disorders, particularly those caused by demyelination, overlap.  However, ADEM usually has symptoms of encephalitis (such as fever or coma), as well as symptoms of myelin damage (visual loss, paralysis), as opposed to MS, which usually doesn’t have encephalitis-like symptoms.  In addition, ADEM usually consists of a single episode or attack, while MS features many attacks over the course of time.  MS, like ADEM, can also be triggered by viral infection or vaccination.
Prognosis of ADEM Triggered by Vaccination
Corticosteroid therapy can shorten the duration of neurological symptoms of ADEM and halt further progression of the disease in the short term, but the long term prognosis for individuals has significant variety.  Studies indicate that half of all patients with ADEM will eventually completely recover. Unfortunately, that leaves the other half that will not.  Of those, the prognoses vary greatly.

OKC Woman Claims Flu Shot Left Her Handicapped
OKLAHOMA CITY –
The flu vaccine is always strongly recommended, but one Oklahoma City woman says the flu shot nearly paralyzed her. She says she got the vaccine five years ago and has been working with doctors and attorneys ever since to prove her case to the federal government.
Once a bubbly, active freshman at the University of Oklahoma, Sydney Rich had asthma, but says it was the H1N1 flu shot in 2010 that drastically changed her life three months after she got the vaccine.
“I was in a coma for about three weeks, and then when I woke up I couldn’t move,” Sydney said.
Now five years later, at 22 years old, Sydney is wheelchair-bound and can barely move the left side of her body.
Sydney says she has an autoimmune disease called Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM) with lesions on her brain and spinal cord. Doctors told her the condition is a result of her flu shot, but federal health officials say that’s tough to prove.
“It’s not common, extremely rare like one in a million,” said Dr. Susan Mendus, the Education and Training Director for Immunization Service for the Oklahoma State Department of Health.
“The vaccine may not have caused her illness, but her illness may have started around the same time she got the vaccine. It’s very difficult to say with certainty that the vaccine caused something that may have been going to happen on its own.”
Sydney has an attorney working to prove her case with the National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program.

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