Study: Association Between Influenza Infection and Vaccination During Pregnancy and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder

Even the CDC has admitted that flu vaccines don’t work
Vaccines are truly one of modern medicine’s biggest farces. The flu vaccine is one of the best examples of this. After all, if the vaccine really worked the way it was supposed to, why would you need to be vaccinated every year? Well, as Mike Adams reports in a Natural News article, the CDC says, “Vaccines wear off.”
Doesn’t that just inspire such confidence? The CDC also tells people that they need to be re-vaccinated each and every year of their lives against the flu because there are so many different strains. Yet, in 2011, people who played along and got their flu shots received the same exact vaccine that was given out in 2010. So, if these vaccines are “so effective,” why did anyone need to be vaccinated again in 2011?
If vaccines work effectively, that would inherently mean that the human recipient now has developed their own antibodies which will protect them against the disease they were vaccinated against. Antibodies last most of your life; that’s why you only got the chicken pox vaccine one time as a child, and not every year. So, what is really going on here with vaccines? Do they work, or don’t they?
As Mike Adams writes:
“They don’t really produce the same quality and strength of antibodies that your own body would produce from a natural infection and recovery.”

Study: Association Between Influenza Infection and Vaccination During Pregnancy and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder
Results  Within this cohort of 196 929 children, influenza was diagnosed in 1400 (0.7%) mothers and 45 231 (23%) received an influenza vaccination during pregnancy. The mean (SD) ages of vaccinated and unvaccinated women were 31.6 (5.2) and 30.4 (5.6) years, respectively. A total number of 3101 (1.6%) children were diagnosed with ASD. After adjusting for covariates, we found that maternal influenza infection (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.04; 95% CI, 0.68-1.58) or influenza vaccination (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.10; 95% CI, 1.00-1.21) anytime during pregnancy was not associated with increased ASD risk. In trimester-specific analyses, first-trimester influenza vaccination was the only period associated with increased ASD risk (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.04-1.39). However, this association could be due to chance (P = 0.1) if Bonferroni corrected for the multiplicity of hypotheses tested (n = 8). Maternal influenza vaccination in the second or third trimester was not associated with increased ASD risk.

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