Basics of the Human Immune System Prior to Introduction of Vaccines: Are Vaccines Turning Our Children’s Immune Systems Inside Out?

Basics of the Human Immune System Prior to Introduction of Vaccines: Are Vaccines Turning Our Children’s Immune Systems Inside Out?
In what may be the most comprehensive review to date on the pathophysiology of adverse vaccine reactions, neurosurgeon Russell Blaylock has compiled a mass of evidence that repeated stimulation of the brain’s immune system results in intense reactions of microglial and astrocyte cells, which serve as the brain’s immune system, with each successive series of vaccinations. This is primarily the result of vaccine adjuvants that are expressly added for this purpose. [1-3]
Although the human immune system is incredibly complex with an immunologic memory capacity that might challenge modern computer systems, its basic structural components are the essence of simplicity with a series of defense systems comparable to a medieval castle with an outer mote, plus outer and inner walls of defense.
The human newborn comes into the world with residual antibodies from the maternal blood stream which, in the absence of breast feeding, would provide overall immunologic protection for about six months, and for measles up to 12 months. For those who do choose or are mandated to vaccinate, why not to vaccinate at five or six months of age rather than compromise and endanger an evolutionary system already in place? Otherwise the newborn immune system is largely rudimentary, requiring a series of microbe challenges to become fully functional, a process requiring two or three years. Without these natural challenges the immune system remains relatively weak and vestigial. This may be the reason that babies are always putting things in their mouths as an instinctive evolutionary trait similar to mammals in the wild.
Cellular and Humoral Immunity
The immune system is divided into two major classes: Cellular immunity, located in the mucous membranes of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts and their respective lymph nodes, and humoral immunity, with production of antigen-specific antibodies by plasma cells in the bone marrow. For eons of time the mucous membranes of the respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts have been the primary sites of microbe exposure and entry into the body, so that cellular immunity has evolved as the primary immune defense system of the body, [4-5] with humoral immunity playing a secondary or backup role.
In the main, the cellular system acts through the process of phagocytosis, which involves engulfing and destroying microorganisms and cellular debris, while the antibody-producing humoral system produces antibodies in the forms of opsonins (enhance phagocytosis), agglutinins (cause agglutination or clumping), precipitins (cause an insoluble complex), and bacteriolysis (to break up). Selected samples from the medical literature indicate that the cellular immune system normally plays a primary or governing role in control of viral [6] and fungal [7] infections. [Emphasis added]

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