Vaccine Failures Keep Mounting — When Will Studies Pointing Out Flaws Result in Healthy Changes?

Vaccine Failures Keep Mounting — When Will Studies Pointing Out Flaws Result in Healthy Changes?
By Dr. Mercola
Do routine vaccinations actually protect us from disease? The fact that repeated outbreaks among vaccinated populations keep occurring suggests that many vaccines are ineffective and do not work as advertised.
One of the most obvious vaccine failures is the mumps vaccine, which is part of the measles, mumps and rubella, otherwise known as the MMR vaccine.
In 2010, two virologists filed a federal lawsuit against Merck, their former employer, alleging the vaccine maker used improper testing methods and falsified data to artificially inflate the efficacy rating of their mumps vaccine.
For details on how they allegedly pulled this off, read Dr. Suzanne Humphries’ excellent summary,1 which explains in layman’s terms how the tests were manipulated.
So why are people still surprised when mumps outbreaks occur? And why are most disease outbreaks still blamed on the unvaccinated minority when most of the infected are in fact often “fully” vaccinated majority?
Second Mumps Outbreak in Vaccinated Populations This Year Strengthens Questions About MMR Effectiveness
This past summer, more than 40 Harvard University students came down with mumps. According to the public health department in Cambridge, every single one of them had been vaccinated.2 Arkansas is now battling an outbreak of mumps that began in August.
As of December 2, 1,824 people had contracted the disease,3 despite 90 to 95 percent of school aged children and 30 to 40 percent of adults involved in the outbreak having been “fully immunized,” according to the Arkansas State Health Department (ADH).4,5,6,7
On September 12, 40/29 News covering Fort Smith and Fayetteville, Arkansas, reported that:8 “The Arkansas Dept. of Health says they have seen no cases of the mumps in people who aren’t immunized.”
Two days later, on September 14, the ADH released an update to the news station showing 16 of the 100 cases in Little Rock, Arkansas, were unvaccinated; four had received one MMR shot and 67 had received two doses of the MMR vaccine. In 13 cases, immunization status was undetermined.9
In King County, where nine cases were reported, all were up-to-date on their MMR vaccine, none needed hospitalization and all recovered.10 Eight of the children were between the ages of 8 and 17. One was 23 years old.
But rather than admitting the mumps vaccine is a failure, the state health department is requiring children with non-medical vaccine exemptions for religious, conscientious or personal beliefs to be excluded from schools where mumps has been identified for 26 days from the date of exposure and until the outbreak has ended.
Students with exemptions who agree to get an MMR shot can return to school immediately — as if excluding unvaccinated children from school when vaccinated children are transmitting the infection is a solution, and that giving more of something that doesn’t work well to begin with would fix the problem.

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219 thoughts on “Vaccine Failures Keep Mounting — When Will Studies Pointing Out Flaws Result in Healthy Changes?

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