Vaccine News – Autism, Vaccination and Immigrants – Yet another Clear Correlation An Update

The Alex Jones Channel – Bombshell – Study Reveals Unvaccinated Children Are Healthier
Dr. Group and Rob Dew join Alex Jones in studio to discuss a new study which shows that unvaccinated children are healthier than those that have been vaccinated.

Four Sanger middle-school students have chickenpox – and they had been vaccinated
By Barbara Anderson
Four students at Washington Academic Middle School are home with chickenpox – and each had previously had vaccinations to prevent getting the disease.
Parents at the Sanger Unified school were notified by telephone Monday night after one student was diagnosed with the highly contagious disease.
That student had attended classes last week, and on Tuesday the district learned that three other students at the middle school had chickenpox, said Kimberly Salomonson, director of pupil services. The three newly-diagnosed students all live in the same house, she said.
Chickenpox has been on the decline since a varicella vaccine became available in 1995, but cases still occur. Just this week, it was reported that nearly 100 unvaccinated students at an elementary school in Agoura Hills in Southern California were told to stay home because of an outbreak at the school.
All four of the Sanger middle-school students were fully immunized against chickenpox, Salomonson said. Most children are now immunized with at least one dose of varicella vaccine, which is 80 to 85 percent effective in preventing chickenpox. Two doses of the vaccine are now recommended. Children should receive the first dose at 12 through 15 months old and a second dose at 4 through 6 years old.. Each of the Sanger students had had the two doses of vaccine, Salomonson said. It’s unusual that someone fully immunized would come down with the disease, but not unheard of, she said. “There is no vaccination that is 100 percent.”

Study 2007 – Residual adverse changes in arterial endothelial function and LDL oxidation after a mild systemic inflammation induced by influenza vaccination
RESULTS:
Influenza vaccination caused a slight elevation in CRP (from 0.5+/-0.1 at baseline, to 2+/-0.6 mg/L, P = 0.01) and fibrinogen (from 2.3+/-0.1 to 2.7+/-0.1 g/L, P = 0.01) at 2 days, which completely resolved at 14 days (CRP: 0.6+/-0.2 mg/L, P = 0.9, and fibrinogen: 2.3+/-0.1 g/L, P = 0.8 versus baseline). OxLDL antibody levels rose significantly at 2 days (from 1+/-0.1 at baseline to 2+/-0.4, P = 0.04), and remained elevated at 14 days (1.7+/-0.3, P = 0.1 versus baseline). FMD of the brachial artery decreased at 2 days (from 8.3+/-1.2% at baseline, to 5.4+/-1%, P = 0.05) with a further decrease at 14 days (4.9+/-0.8%, P = 0.03 versus baseline). The dilatory responses to GTN and the carotid IMT remained unchanged throughout the study period (P>0.5).

CONCLUSION:
Abnormalities in arterial function and LDL oxidation may persist for at least 2 weeks after a slight inflammatory reaction induced by influenza vaccination. These could explain in part the earlier reported increase in cardiovascular risk during the first weeks after an acute inflammatory disorder.

Merck Admits Shingles Vaccine Can Cause Eye Damage…and Shingles
BY CLAIRE DWOSKIN
Two important FDA approved changes to the warning label of Merck Pharmaceutical’s shingles vaccine, Zostavax, have been made since the controversial drug was introduced in 2006.  The first was in August 2014, when, in addition to potentially causing chickenpox, another side effect was added: shingles! That’s right. The vaccine that had been – and continues to be — aggressively marketed to prevent seniors from contracting this excruciating condition was found to actually cause shingles in some individuals.
In February of this year, the FDA approved a label change to warn those who prescribe the Zostavax vaccine of another potential side effect: “Eye Disorders: necrotizing retinitis.”

Bill would prevent unvaccinated children from being excluded from school
Lindsay Gingrich (231) 439-9353 – lgingrich@petoskeynews.com May 12, 2017
A new bill that was introduced to the Michigan House of Representatives on March 28 would prevent public health officials from excluding children from school who have not been vaccinated in the event of a disease outbreak, except in “epidemic” situations.
Proposed by several legislators including local representatives Lee Chatfield and Triston Cole, the bill has been referred to the Committee on Education Reform.
“Parents have a fundamental right to direct the education and upbringing of their children,” Chatfield said in a statement. “While I have personally chosen to vaccinate my children, parents should not be required to participate in a government program in order to exercise their right to make medical decisions for their children.”

WATCH: The secret Perth screening of a controversial film questioning vaccine safety has sparked an angry backlash from health authorities. #TenNews

Autism, Vaccination and Immigrants – Yet another Clear Correlation An Update
Minnesota
By Edward Yazbak MD
A recent measles outbreak has recently been reported in Minnesota.
According to the MN State Department of Health, there have been 51 confirmed measles cases (48 children and 3 adults) as of May 10, 2017.
Forty seven cases were unvaccinated, one case had 1 dose of MMR vaccine and two cases had 2 doses of MMR. The vaccination status of one case was unknown.
There was no mention of hospitalization or death.
Forty six cases were Somali Minnesotan.
The previous measles outbreak was in 2011 when 26 cases were reported.
Wolff and Madlon-Kay discussed that 2011 measles outbreak in their publication titled “Childhood vaccine beliefs reported by Somali and non-Somali parents”.
They reported that: “Somali parents were more likely than non-Somali parents to have refused the MMR vaccine for their child (odds ratio, 4.6; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-18.0). Most of them refused vaccines because they had heard of adverse effects associated with the vaccine or personally knew someone who suffered an adverse effect. Somali parents were significantly more likely to believe that autism is caused by vaccines (35% vs. 8% of non-Somali parents). Somalis were also more likely to be uncomfortable with administering multiple vaccines at one visit (odds ratio, 4.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-11.9) and more likely to believe that children receive too many vaccines.”
The authors concluded that: “Statistically significant differences in perceptions and use of vaccines were reported by Somali and non-Somali participants. Somali parents are more likely to believe that the MMR vaccine causes autism and more likely to refuse the MMR vaccine than non-Somali parents. These beliefs have contributed to an immunization gap between Somali and non-Somali children.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25002000
The complete publication is available at http://www.jabfm.org/content/27/4/458.long

 

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