Cynthia: Flesh-Eating Synthetic Bacteria Has Mutated, Spreading Uncontrollably

Cynthia: Flesh-Eating Synthetic Bacteria Has Mutated, Spreading Uncontrollably
Back in April 2010, an explosion at a British Petroleum oil rig resulted in millions of barrels of oil contaminating the Gulf of Mexico. Despite the drastic measures taken to prevent an environmental catastrophe, an oil slick produced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill covered over sixty thousand square miles.
As one of the means of addressing the environmental catastrophe on their hands, Washington decided to take drastic measures, regardless of the possible consequences of those actions. It was at that time when an artificially created microorganism nicknamed Cynthia was unleashed, without any kind of examination of the possible threat it may pose to the environment.
Cynthia is the brainchild of the J. Craig Venter Institute — which was engaged in genetic engineering experiments since the beginning of the 21st century — and Synthetic Genomics Inc, and was created and funded directly by BP. It was believed that Cynthia feeds on oil, but it turns out now that it is equally willing to consume all forms of organic life as well…
In 2011, Cynthia was unleashed in the Gulf of Mexico and in its initial stages of life it was absorbing oil slicks at breathtaking speed. In January, 2011 the Register reported that scientists were particularly impressed by the speed with which the bacteria was eating up its “meal”.
But then this bacteria mutated and soon was feeding on organic lifeforms. Strange reports started coming from the US, like five thousand birds falling victims of an “unknown disease” in Arkansas, or more that a hundred thousand dead fish found off the coast of north Louisiana. It was also reported that a total of 128 British Petroleum employees that participated in the liquidation of the oil slick were struck by some mysterious illness. According to various sources they were forbidden to seek relief in public hospitals, to prevent them from talking to anyone about what has happened to them…

Red Alert: Artificial Flesh-Eating Bacteria ‘Synthia’ Is Destroying All Life
The Artificial Flesh-Eating Bacteria, Synthia, was released at the Gulf of Mexico to eat oil in the water caused by oil giant BP in 2010. It turned out the bacteria mutated and it consume all forms of organic life as well. This project was supported by ‘BP’. Remarkably, this is ignored from all sides!
Read the full news article here

MYSTERIOUS NEW BLOOD BACTERIA SEEMS LIKE NANOBOT BIOWEAPON

Dr. Nick Delgado is a researcher of biochemistry and endocrinology, with a special focus on anti-aging medicine. In this clip, Dr. Delgado speaks to me about a disturbing new phenomenon that he’s been observing for about a year and a half.

When he examines patients, Dr. Delgado puts a drop of their blood beneath a microscope. After 40 years of studying blood morphology, he has never previously seen or heard of the 1-micron-sized* tiny “tadpoles”, which he’s been seeing lately, which school like fish in large groups around the blood cells, moving in unison and changing rapidly in direction. The people carrying these “tadpoles” all describe having a persistent cough.

These “tadpoles” somewhat resemble a class of microbe called flagella. A common example of a flagellate bacterium is the ulcer-causing Helicobacter pylori – however, these “tadpoles” behave differently from anything he’s ever seen.

Dr. Delgado isn’t sure whether these are a “super” bacteria or exactly what they are but he’s encountered cases in Northern- and Southern California, as well as in Florida. After I suggested that if they were not readily identifiable as microbes, that these might be some sort of bioweapon, he remarked that he was open to this possibility.

Can the Bacteria in Your Gut Explain Your Mood?

Eighteen vials were rocking back and forth on a squeaky mechanical device the shape of a butcher scale, and Mark Lyte was beside himself with excitement. ‘‘We actually got some fresh yesterday — freshly frozen,’’ Lyte said to a lab technician. Each vial contained a tiny nugget of monkey feces that were collected at the Harlow primate lab near Madison, Wis., the day before and shipped to Lyte’s lab on the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center campus in Abilene, Tex.
Lyte’s interest was not in the feces per se but in the hidden form of life they harbor. The digestive tube of a monkey, like that of all vertebrates, contains vast quantities of what biologists call gut microbiota. The genetic material of these trillions of microbes, as well as others living elsewhere in and on the body, is collectively known as the microbiome. Taken together, these bacteria can weigh as much as six pounds, and they make up a sort of organ whose functions have only begun to reveal themselves to science. Lyte has spent his career trying to prove that gut microbes communicate with the nervous system using some of the same neurochemicals that relay messages in the brain.
Inside a closet-size room at his lab that afternoon, Lyte hunched over to inspect the vials, whose samples had been spun down in a centrifuge to a radiant, golden broth. Lyte, 60, spoke fast and emphatically. ‘‘You wouldn’t believe what we’re extracting out of poop,’’ he told me. ‘‘We found that the guys here in the gut make neurochemicals. We didn’t know that. Now, if they make this stuff here, does it have an influence there? Guess what? We make the same stuff. Maybe all this communication has an influence on our behavior.’’

Read more at:

How Gut Bacteria Are Shaking Up Cancer Research

Top scientists at Roche Holding AG and AstraZeneca Plc are sizing up potential allies in the fight against cancer: the trillions of bacteria that live in the human body.

“Five years ago, if you had asked me about bacteria in your gut playing an important role in your systemic immune response, I probably would have laughed it off,” Daniel Chen, head of cancer immunotherapy research at Roche’s Genentech division, said in a phone interview. “Most of us immunologists now believe that there really is an important interaction there.”

Two recent studies published in the journal Science have intrigued Chen and others who are developing medicines called immunotherapies that stimulate the body’s ability to fight tumors.

Read more at:

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-03-14/how-gut-bacteria-are-shaking-up-cancer-research

Study finds human breast milk containing high levels of bacteria is being sold online

Study finds human breast milk containing high levels of bacteria is being sold online

  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital, in Ohio, carried out study
  • Found 74 per cent of 101 samples from one site were potentially harmful
  • Lead researcher warns parents they cannot know where milk is from
  • Food and Drug Administration advises against using milk bought online