Just News – djvlad – Lord Jamar on Azealia Banks Sacrificing Chickens, African Spirituality

 

djvlad – Lord Jamar on Azealia Banks Sacrificing Chickens, African Spirituality
In this segment from Lord Jamar’s latest interview with VladTV, Lord Jamar offers his opinions on Azealia Banks, who admitted she has sacrificed chickens in her closet. “There are a lot of things in African religion that are not understood by the masses,” he says. LJ continues to speak about original African religion, how to achieve enlightenment, and how he still struggles at times to control his emotions. Watch the clip above.

Panic-stricken Ukrainians storm shops, banks and gas stations

Panic-stricken Ukrainians storm shops, banks and gas stations

Bloodshed on Independence Square (Maidan) and rumors of worst yet to come have prompted panic among Ukrainians, with many fleeing the country and those who stay emptying shop shelves, queuing for gasoline and making big cash withdrawals from banks.

  The mood is a pre-war one in most Ukrainian cities, where people,  afraid of the country falling deeper into economic paralysis, are  trying to buy up as many essential foods and goods as they can.  Fearing stampedes, some Kiev shops have started limiting the  amount of shoppers at any one time.

  Some shop-owners confess they are running out of stocks to refill  the fast-emptying shelves, and new deliveries are not expected  anytime soon amid the current turmoil.

  Social media is swarming with pictures of over-crowded stores and  scarce supplies.

This is not a joke. No bread, no eggs, only expensive  imported spaghetti left, huge lines and this is in a small local  village shop,” Instagram user @iartemka says, adding up a  #PrayForUkraine hashtag.

People in the shops have gone mad. Huge queues, empty  shelves,” Twitter user ‏@Helen_Marlen writes.

 

Live from Kiev:

https://elementulhuliganic.wordpress.com/live-from-kiev/

Banks Deploy Capital Controls By Stealth

Banks Deploy Capital Controls By Stealth

China’s central bank is now the latest to roll out capital controls

Kit Daniels Infowars.com January 26, 2014

Following a worldwide trend towards capital controls by major banks, the Central Bank of China has now ordered its commercial banks to suspend cash transfers for three days and foreign currency conversions for nine days, starting Jan. 30.

The central bank in China is now the latest to roll out capital controls. Credit: Carpkazu via Wiki

The central bank in China is scrambling for cash under the guise of “system maintenance.” Credit: Carpkazu via Wiki

Affecting every commercial bank in China, the ban will stop domestic renminbi transfers from Jan. 30 to Feb. 2 and conversions of renminbi to foreign currency from Jan. 30 to Feb. 7.

Citigroup recently sent the following notice for its customers in China, according to Forbes:

Important Notice:

1. Due to the system maintenance of People’s Bank of China, Domestic RMB Fund Transfer through Citibank (China) Online and Citi will be delayed during January 30th 2014, 16:00pm to February 2nd 2014, 18:30pm. As to the fund availability at the receiving bank, it depends on the processing requirements and turnaround time of the receiving bank. We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

2. During Spring Festival, Foreign Currency Transfer Transaction through Citibank (China) Online and Citi Mobile will be temporally not available from January 30, 2014 18:00pm to February 7, 2014 09:00am. We apologize for any inconvenience caused.

If you are calling from other parts of the world, please reach us at 86-20-38801267 for banking services or 86-21-38969500 for credit card services.

Despite the official reason, it is highly unlikely that the central bank would schedule maintenance during a peak period for Chinese banks, the week-long Lunar New Year holiday, which begins on Jan. 31.

China is rather implementing capitol controls by stealth, following a recent pattern by other financial institutions worldwide to prevent customers from withdrawing and transferring funds.

Recently, British multinational bank HSBC prevented its customers from withdrawing large amounts of cash from their accounts without a specific reason.

Too Big To Fail Banks Are Taking Over As Number Of U.S. Banks Falls To All-Time Record Low

Too Big To Fail Banks Are Taking Over As Number Of U.S. Banks Falls To All-Time Record Low

The too big to fail banks have a larger share of the U.S. banking industry than they have ever had before.  So if having banks that were too big to fail was a “problem” back in 2008, what is it today?  As you will read about below, the total number of banks in the United States has fallen to a brand new all-time record low and that means that the health of the too big to fail banks is now more critical to our economy than ever.  In 1985, there were more than 18,000 banks in the United States.  Today, there are only 6,891 left, and that number continues to drop every single year.  That means that more than 10,000 U.S. banks have gone out of existence since 1985.  Meanwhile, the too big to fail banks just keep on getting even bigger.  In fact, the six largest banks in the United States (JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley) have collectively gotten 37 percent larger over the past five years.  If even one of those banks collapses, it would be absolutely crippling to the U.S. economy.  If several of them were to collapse at the same time, it could potentially plunge us into an economic depression unlike anything that this nation has ever seen before.

Incredibly, there were actually more banks in existence back during the days of the Great Depression than there is today.  According to the Wall Street Journal, the federal government has been keeping track of the number of banks since 1934 and this year is the very first time that the number has fallen below 7,000…

Job Cuts Loom at European Banks as Economy Pinches Fees

Job Cuts Loom at European Banks as Economy Pinches Fees

European banks, which eliminated more than 140,000 jobs in two years, are poised to keep shrinking.

Lenders in the region probably will cut at least 5 percent of trading and advisory staff next year, according to a survey of three London-based investment-bank recruiters, and the reductions could reach 15 percent, two of them said. That would be twice the 7 percent shrinkage across the industry since 2011.

European firms are lagging behind U.S. counterparts in meeting stricter limits on leverage, putting pressure on them to cut assets. At the same time, a stagnant economy is crimping fees from investment banking and merger advice, eroding returns. That may force banks to eliminate more jobs next year, dispose of whole businesses and surrender market share in fixed income.

“As European banks focus on leverage, they’re losing market share to U.S. firms,” said Philippe Bodereau, the London-based head of European credit research at Pacific Investment Management Co., the world’s largest fixed-income manager. “We’re seeing a lot of banks that are starting to cut balance sheets. Cost control will remain a big item.”

Banks in Europe with global securities businesses, including Deutsche Bank AG and Barclays Plc, posted a 13 percent drop in third-quarter investment-banking revenue, hurt by lower fixed-income trading, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. That exceeded a 9 percent decline at the largest U.S. firms.

OECD chief urges banks to lend more

OECD Secretary General Angel Guirra met with MEPs on Tuesday to share his outlook for Europe’s…

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http://www.euronews.com/2013/11/26/oe…
OECD Secretary General Angel Guirra met with MEPs on Tuesday to share his outlook for Europe’s economy.

The OECD sees eurozone growth of 1 percent next year, hitting 1.6 percent in 2015.

Gurria told that banks need to increase lending to homes and businesses to fire up European growth once more.

“It’s not enough that the banks don’t go bankrupt.They have to lend. The problem is that they are not lending,” he told euronews’ Efi Koutsokosta.

“Governments can help by providing some guarantees maybe, some incentives, by sharing some of the initial losses.”

The former Mexican finance minister will be in the Greek capital of Athens on Wednesday when the OECD will unveil its latest report on the country’s economy.

Mr Gurria told euronews: A country like Greece which is not yet out of the programme is vulnerable and needs support. There’s work to be done in terms of collecting taxes and privatization. There’s work to be done in the fundamental elements of competitiveness, in education, innovation issues.”

Greece’s debt pile currently stands at 175.5 percent of GDP.