Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Harmful for Babies

Acetaminophen (Tylenol) Harmful for Babies
An article in the New York Times this week warns that prenatal use of acetaminophen—the main ingredient in Tylenol—has been linked to an increased risk of asthma and attention disorders in children whose mothers took the drug.
Acetaminophen is found in over 600 over-the-counter and prescription medications. Petra Arck, professor of fetal-maternal medicine at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, whose rodent experiments have found that acetaminophen stresses the liver and alters the placenta in pregnant mice, told the Times that because it’s so common pregnant women may be taking more acetaminophen than they are aware.
The damage done by acetaminophen seems to be dose dependent—the more a pregnant woman takes, the more serious the effects in her offspring. But since it’s found in so many products, many marketed for babies and children, what if infants, too, are being exposed to damagingly high levels of acetaminophen?
If acetaminophen can harm the fetus during pregnancy, when the baby has the protection of the mother’s liver, as well as the placenta, what if it’s even more harmful when given directly to infants?

But evidence has accumulated that, when taken during pregnancy, acetaminophen may increase the risk that children will develop asthma or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The elevated risk in most studies is small, and whether the drug itself is really to blame is debatable. But considering that more than 65 percent of pregnant women in the United States use acetaminophen at some point during their pregnancy, the number of children with problems stemming from it could be substantial.
The odd thing about acetaminophen is that even after decades of widespread use, no one knows precisely how it blunts pain. But it has earned a reputation for strange side effects. Experiments indicate that it impedes people’s ability to empathize. It may undercut the brain’s ability to detect errors. When taken after a vaccine, it may suppress the immune system. Why might the drug affect both asthma and A.D.H.D. rates? Scientists have variously speculated that it could tweak the immune system during pregnancy, or disrupt hormones, or change growth factors in the developing brain. In short, no one knows.

Acetaminophen is the most common drug ingredient in America. There are more than 600 medicines that contain acetaminophen, including over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription (Rx) medicines. Below is a list of some common brand-name medicines, some forms of which contain acetaminophen.

Some Common Over-the-Counter Brand Name Drugs That Contain Acetaminophen

Actifed®
Alka-Seltzer Plus®
Anacin®
Cepacol®
Contac®
Coricidin®
Dayquil®
Dimetapp®
Dristan®
Excedrin®
Feverall®
Formula 44®
Goody’s® Powders
Liquiprin®
Midol®
Mucinex®
Nyquil®
Panadol®
Robitussin®
Saint Joseph® Aspirin-Free
Singlet®
Sinutab®
Sudafed®
Theraflu®
Triaminic®
TYLENOL® Brand Products
Vanquish®
Vicks®
*And store brands

Some Common Prescription Drugs That Contain Acetaminophen (or APAP)

Butalbital®
Endocet®
Fioricet®
Hycotab®
Hydrocet®
Hydrocodone Bitartrate®
Lortab®
MIDRIN®
NORCO®
Oxycodone®
Percocet®
Phenaphen®
ROXICET ™
Sedapap®
Tapanol®
Tramadol
TYLENOL® with Codeine
Tylox®
Ultracet®
Vicodin®
Zydone®
*And generic drugs

FDA approved fraud : The FDA conducts NO scientific studies on drugs

Wait … What? The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) really doesn’t conduct any scientific studies on the very drugs it approves? No, it doesn’t, and the facts surrounding this reality will shock and anger you.

This point was recently brought out – again – by the Alliance for Natural Health, in a short video made in response to a bogus Public Broadcasting System (PBS) documentary, in which the taxpayer-funded network claimed that vitamin and nutrient supplements are not regulated at all by the federal government.

While that is simply not true, PBS nevertheless repeated the claim, echoing what other government officials, Big Pharma representatives and operatives of the traditional medical industry have said.

“The claim is that drugs are tightly regulated, while supplements are not regulated at all,” the video says. “This is totally false but a recent documentary from the Public Broadcasting Service’s Frontline made the claim anyway.”

The documentary went on to claim that supplements may actually be dangerous, even though there is a wealth of evidence noting that they are among the safest things humans can ingest when it comes to maintaining good health.

No drugs should EVER be mandatory: New Mexico rejects legislation that would force children to ingest psychiatric medication

In one state, at least, it is no longer permissible to force parents at gunpoint to allow their children to be given dangerous psychotropic drugs.

As reported by The New American (TNA), a new law in New Mexico to protect kids from coercive psychiatric screening and medication was approved last year in the state, and now advocates for the law hope it will spread to other states and provide similar protection for children, families and parental rights.

As TNA reported further, Big Pharma and the Obama Administration have been pushing hard to unconstitutionally spread mandatory “mental health” screening, treatment and tracking of children nationwide. But health freedom advocates say laws like the one on the books in New Mexico “could offer much-needed protection in the years ahead. And progress is already being made,” TNA noted.

The legislation in New Mexico, which was supported by members of both major political parties and passed nearly unanimously in both chambers of the state legislature, is being celebrated by its advocates as the toughest forced medication protection law in the country. Formally titled the “Child Medication Safety Act,” the measure sought to address what is viewed by many as an alarming trend in the U.S. – threats and coercion against families and their children when it comes to forcing psychiatric evaluation and subsequent mandatory medication with dangerous mind-altering drugs.

Read more at:

http://www.naturalnews.com/053554_New_Mexico_psychiatric_drugs_forced_medication.html

Flush with coke: UK so high on cocaine that users have ‘contaminated tap water’

Flush with coke: UK so high on cocaine that users have ‘contaminated tap water’

Experts from the drinking water inspectorate found that cocaine use in Britain is now so high it has contaminated the drinking water supply, even after it has gone through intensive purification treatments, UK media reports.

Scientists found supplies of drinking water contained traces of benzoylecgonine, the metabolized form of the drug after it has been processed by the human body. Benzoylecgonine is the same compound used for urine-based tests for cocaine, the Sunday Times reports.

The findings are an eye-opening indication of how widely the drug is used in Britain.

“We have near the highest level of cocaine use in western Europe. It has also been getting cheaper and cheaper at the same time as its use has been going up,” Steve Rolles, from the drug policy think-tank Transform, told the Sunday Times.

Nearly 700,000 people aged 16-59 are estimated to take cocaine every year in Britain, and there are around 180,000 addicted users of crack cocaine, according to the charity DrugScope.

Health officials stressed that the amounts found in drinking water were very low and unlikely to represent a danger to the public, however.

A recent report from Public Health England found that quantitiess of cocaine at 4 nanograms per liter, around one-quarter of what was found before the water was treated.

“Estimated exposures for most of the detected compounds are at least thousands of times below doses seen to produce adverse effects in animals and hundreds of thousands below human therapeutic doses,” the report states.

Although cocaine use in Britain is among the highest in Europe, its use has actually decreased since the 2008 financial crisis and has been steadily falling among 16-24 year olds, who no longer see it as glamorous – largely because its widespread availability has reduced its subversive appeal.

But among older generations, it still retains its whiff of subversive decadence and glamour.

“It’s ridiculous, I’ve been at parties when there have been more people in the bathroom than outside it, yet this strange etiquette is still upheld. I think it’s partly about exclusion and inclusion – who’s in, who’s out, who’s cool and who’s not. It’s remarkably childish, but if you’re a middle-aged professional who doesn’t get out much, then that bathroom can seem like the hottest ticket in town,” Matthew, a 49-year-old corporate lawyer, told The Guardian.

Lebanon cannabis trade thrives in shadow of Syrian war

Lebanese marijuana growers are finding that the shadow of the conflict in neighbouring Syria is providing them cover for a thriving cannabis industry