World Renowned Scientist Michio Kaku Proves Existence Of God

World Renowned Scientist Michio Kaku Proves Existence Of God
Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku, one of the most respected scientists today claimed that he found definitive proof of the existence of God. The information he shared created a great stir in the scientific community simply because of his status as one of the creators and developers of the revolutionary String Theory, which is highly regarded everywhere in the world.
The report on Feroces Mente explained that to come to this conclusion, he made use of what is called as the “primitive semi-radius tachyons,” which are theoretical particles that are capable of unsticking the Universe matter or the vaccum space between particles. They then leave everything free from the influence of the universe that surrounds them.
While working on this theory, Kaku discovered what he says is the evidence that the universe was created by an intelligence rather than by random forces. To put it simply, as stated by Catholic.org, he said that we live in a Matrix-style universe.
“I have concluded that we are in a world made by rules created by an intelligence,” the scientist said. “Believe me, everything that we call chance today won’t make sense anymore. To me it is clear that we exist in a plan which is governed by rules that were created, shaped by a universal intelligence and not by chance.”
So does this mean that he believes in the omnipotence of God? Yes, and no. Despite his theory of an intelligence being the maker of the universe, he may also be referring to Spinosa’s God, which is a sort of deitification of the laws of the universe itself. This is the kind of God that Einstein also concluded years before

Vodafone reveals existence of secret wires that allow state surveillance

Vodafone reveals existence of secret wires that allow state surveillance

Wires allow agencies to listen to or record live conversations, in what privacy campaigners are calling a ‘nightmare scenario’

Vodafone, one of the world’s largest mobile phone groups, has revealed the existence of secret wires that allow government agencies to listen to all conversations on its networks, saying they are widely used in some of the 29 countries in which it operates in Europe and beyond.

The company has broken its silence on government surveillance in order to push back against the increasingly widespread use of phone and broadband networks to spy on citizens, and will publish its first Law Enforcement Disclosure Report on Friday . At 40,000 words, it is the most comprehensive survey yet of how governments monitor the conversations and whereabouts of their people.

The company said wires had been connected directly to its network and those of other telecoms groups, allowing agencies to listen to or record live conversations and, in certain cases, track the whereabouts of a customer. Privacy campaigners said the revelations were a “nightmare scenario” that confirmed their worst fears on the extent of snooping.

In Albania, Egypt, Hungary, India, Malta, Qatar, Romania, South Africa and Turkey, it is unlawful to disclose any information related to wiretapping or interception of the content of phone calls and messages including whether such capabilities exist.

“For governments to access phone calls at the flick of a switch is unprecedented and terrifying,” said the Liberty director, Shami Chakrabarti. “[Edward] Snowden revealed the internet was already treated as fair game. Bluster that all is well is wearing pretty thin – our analogue laws need a digital overhaul.”

In about six of the countries in which Vodafone operates, the law either obliges telecoms operators to install direct access pipes, or allows governments to do so. The company, which owns mobile and fixed broadband networks, including the former Cable & Wireless business, has not named the countries involved because certain regimes could retaliate by imprisoning its staff.

vodafone graphic

Direct-access systems do not require warrants, and companies have no information about the identity or the number of customers targeted. Mass surveillance can happen on any telecoms network without agencies having to justify their intrusion to the companies involved.

 

More at:

http://www.theguardian.com/business/2014/jun/06/vodafone-reveals-secret-wires-allowing-state-surveillance?CMP=twt_gu