The controversies will find Merck defending itself and its vaccine in at least two federal court cases

The controversies will find Merck defending itself and its vaccine in at least two federal court cases after a U.S. District judge earlier this month threw out Merck’s attempts at dismissal. Merck now faces federal charges of fraud from the whistleblowers, a vaccine competitor and doctors in New Jersey and New York. Merck could also need to defend itself in Congress: The staff of representative Bill Posey (R-Fla) — a longstanding critic of the CDC interested in an alleged link between vaccines and autism — is now reviewing some 1,000 documents that the CDC whistleblower turned over to them.
The first court case, United States v. Merck & Co., stems from claims by two former Merck scientists that Merck “fraudulently misled the government and omitted, concealed, and adulterated material information regarding the efficacy of its mumps vaccine in violation of the FCA [False Claims Act].”
The second court case, Chatom Primary Care v. Merck & Co. relies on the same whistleblower evidence. This class action suit claims damages because Merck had fraudulently monopolized the mumps market. Doctors and medical practices in the suit would be able to obtain compensation for having been sold an overpriced monopolized product, and a defective one to boot, in that the mumps vaccine wasn’t effective (indeed, the suit alleged that Merck expected outbreaks to occur and, as predicted, they did — mumps epidemics occurred in 2006 in a highly vaccinated population and again in 2009-2010).

‘Let’s find out the truth’: Robert de Niro says autistic son changed ‘overnight’ after MMR jab as he says he regrets pulling anti-vaccination movie from Tribeca Film Festival

De Niro, who has an autistic son, 18, claimed today he is not anti-vaccine
•He insists there is more to MMR controversy saying ‘let’s find out the truth’
•Actor claims his autistic son changed ‘overnight’ after receiving the jab
•De Niro announced plans last week to screen Vaxxed: From Cover-up to Catastrophe at Tribecca Film Festival
•Documentary sees Andrew Wakefield attempt to reignite MMR controversy
•Film was axed from Tribecca after other filmmakers threatened to pull out
•Actor ‘regretted’ pulling movie but hadn’t wanted backlash to affect festival

Read more at:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3537962/Let-s-truth-Robert-Niro-says-autistic-son-changed-overnight-MMR-jab-insists-isn-t-anti-vaccine-just-pro-safe-vaccines.html

Uzbekistan Is Using Genetic Testing to Find Future Olympians

Uzbekistan Is Using Genetic Testing to Find Future Olympians

The idea of using genetic testing to spot future world-class athletes has been bandied about for years. Now, Uzbekistan hopes to get a jump on the competition by testing children as young as 10 to determine their athletic potential.

Rustam Muhamedov, director of the genetics laboratory at Uzbekistan’s Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, announced the program for “sports selection at the molecular genetic level” on January 5 in the government-owned Pravda Vostoka newspaper.

He said in an interview that the program, overseen by Uzbekistan’s Academy of Sciences, would be “implemented in practice” in early 2015 in cooperation with the National Olympic Committee and several of the country’s national sports federations—including soccer, swimming, and rowing.

Muhamedov’s team began studying the genes of champion Uzbek athletes two years ago. He says that after another year of work in Tashkent, his team will be ready to publish a panel presentation on a specific set of 50 genes that he claims will identify future champions.

“Developed countries throughout the world like the United States, China, and European countries are researching the human genome and have discovered genes that define a propensity for specific sports,” Muhamedov says. “We want to use these methods in order to help select our future champions.” In practice, Muhamedov says that after the 50 genes of a child are tested from a blood sample, “their parents will be told what sports they are best suited for”—such as distance running or weightlifting.

Muhamedov’s announcement marks the first time any country’s Olympic Committee has been officially linked to a program using genetic tests to recommend specific sports programs for children.

The idea of gene testing is source of controversy, with supporters viewing it as a new frontier in sports science and critics saying it presents a labyrinth of complicated legal, moral, and ethical issues. But unlike genetic doping, which is the use of genetic therapy with substances such as EPO to enhance athletic performance, genetically testing potential athletes is not banned by the International Olympic Committee or by global sports federations. The World Anti-Doping Agency, which promotes, monitors, and coordinates the global fight against doping in sports, has nevertheless strongly discouraged genetic tests for athletic performance.

David Epstein, a sports science journalist and author of the best-selling book The Sports Gene, explains that genes are important in terms of athletic achievement and development. But he doubts Muhamedov’s claims that genetic tests can accurately identify future world-champion athletes.

Find suggests Buddha lived in 6th century B.C.

The discovery of an previously unknown wooden structure at the Buddha’s birthplace suggests the sage might have lived in the 6th century BC, two centuries earlier than thought

 

Healthcare.gov running on ‘Hope and Change’ as HHS announces bid to find actual programmers who can write functional code

http://www.naturalnews.com/042596_Obamacare_programmers_Hope_and_Change.html#

NaturalNews) More than two weeks after the hoax launch of the fake “shell” website Healthcare.gov which did not function, the Obama administration has announced plans to bring in real programmers and attempt to build an online federal health exchange site that actually functions.
A widely publicized HHS blog post calls this, “doing better,” continuing the absurd lie that Healthcare.gov only suffered from minor glitches and small problems that need incremental “improvements.”
At no time has HHS acknowledged the fact that the Healthcare.gov website is structurally flawed and suffers from deep design failures that cannot simply be patched.
The utter incompetence of HHS is obvious in its attempted explanations for why the launch of the site has been such a disaster. “We have made a number of improvements to the account service,” the HHS blog states. “Initially, we implemented a virtual ‘waiting room,’ but many found this experience to be confusing.”
Maybe that’s because the very idea of an “online waiting room” is laughable. Imagine if Amazon.com had a waiting room where you had to take a number and wait your turn before you could make a purchase. Or imagine if Priceline.com made you wait an hour or two before you could check prices from multiple airlines. Nobody uses the internet to sit around and wait for some poorly-designed code to try to catch up. That the federal government thought this was a brilliant idea is yet more proof that the people running this system still have no clue what they’re doing.

Obama administration suddenly decides to start figuring out where the errors are, two weeks AFTER the launch

To the great astonishment of programmers everywhere, Healthcare.gov was only tested for 5 – 7 days before launch. Yep, less than a week of testing.
At no time was the site subjected to any sort of intelligent error monitoring or debugging effort. In fact, HHS is now celebrating the fact that it has suddenly discovered debugging principles and will now implement them!
From its blog:
We’re …putting in place tools and processes to aggressively monitor and identify parts of HealthCare.gov where individuals are encountering errors or having difficulty using the site, so we can prioritize and fix them.
Gee, that’s amazing. It’s almost as if they think they discovered “software debugging” or something. I mean, WOW, you mean there are tools for figuring out where errors happen? Somebody should patent that!

Entrepreneurs find success in Detroit

Entrepreneurs find success in Detroit

By John Yang, Correspondent, NBC News

DETROIT — It’s a scene that fits most people’s image of Silicon Valley, not the Motor City: young engineers taking a break with a ping pong game, a business meeting in bean bag chairs, and rows and rows of 20-somethings intently studying computer code on screens.

The setting is two floors of downtown Detroit’s Madison Building, which was built in 1917 — just four years after Henry Ford revolutionized manufacturing with the assembly line. It’s now home to more than two dozen high-tech start-ups backed by two venture capital firms.  

And it could be the home of Detroit’s economic resurgence as these companies try to rekindle the entrepreneurial spirit of men named Ford, Olds and Chrysler who helped make this city the center of the automobile industry more than a century ago.

 

“The tipping point is here,” declared Jacob Cohen, vice president of Detroit Venture Partners. The firm, whose backers include Quicken Loans founder Dan Gilbert, has invested more than $11 million.

“The entrepreneurs of Michigan are now staying in Detroit and they want to be part of this story,” Cohen said.

‘Detroit has given us opportunities’

After getting his master’s degree at MIT, Michigan-native Paul Glomski moved to Detroit to start his company, Detroit Labs, which makes smartphone apps. Clients include GM and Domino’s Pizza. In less than two years, the workforce has grown from four to 32–and is expected to hit 60 later this year. The company has already outgrown its workspace and is moving to a new location.

Teen Orphan Tugs at Churchgoers’ Heartstrings to Find a Family

Teen Orphan Tugs at Churchgoers’ Heartstrings to Find a Family

A 15-year-old Florida boy who’s been in foster care his entire life is so desperate for a family to call his own, that he recently took matters into his own hands.

Davion Navar Henry Only gathered his courage and stepped up to the pulpit at St. Mark Missionary Baptist Church in St. Petersberg, Florida, asking, directly, if anyone there might want to adopt him. He told the parishioners, “I know God hasn’t given up on me. So I’m not giving up, either.”

After learning that his biological mother, who gave birth to him while she was in prison, had passed away, he asked his caseworker, Connie Going, to take him to church so that he could make his request. She agreed.

Arriving in a donated black suit too large for him, wearing a zip-on tie that he wouldn’t have known how to tie himself, he followed intently along with the sermon before declaring, “I’ll take anyone. Old or young, dad or mom, black, white, purple. I don’t care. And I would be really appreciative. The best I could be.”