Gov’t seeks approval for dumping Fukushima plant groundwater into sea

Gov’t seeks approval for dumping Fukushima plant groundwater into sea

TOKYO, Feb. 3, Kyodo

The government on Monday sought approval of a nationwide fisheries federation to dump groundwater at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear complex into the sea on condition that the water’s contamination level is far below the legal limit.

 During talks with the head of the National Federation of Fisheries Co-operative Associations, industry ministry officials explained that they plan to set “strict” operational procedures for the pump system to allay the concerns of fishermen who think the move could deal a blow to their business.

Groundwater will be pumped out before it gets mixed with highly radioactive water accumulating at the basement of reactor buildings, and will be directed to the adjacent Pacific Ocean.

Rice grown near crippled Fukushima nuclear plant served to govt officials

Rice grown near crippled Fukushima nuclear plant served to govt officials

Rice from fields in the Fukushima prefecture, evacuated after the worst nuclear disaster in Japan, will be served to government officials for 9 days in a bid to demonstrate the safety of the country’s most-beloved crop, a local broadcaster reported.

  The rice cultivated in several decontaminated fields in the  Yamakiya District in Kawamata Town and Iitate Village, two areas  designated as evacuation zones after the March 2011 nuclear  catastrophe, will be served in a government office in Tokyo from  Monday.

  Over half a ton (540 kilograms) of rice will be part of a test to  prove the effectiveness of the decontamination process. Officials  from the Fukushima prefecture have given assurances that the rice  contains no radioactive substances.

  The rice balls tasted especially good after the great effort put  into cultivating the crop, said Senior Vice Environment Minister  Shinji Inoue on Monday. Parliamentary Vice Environment Minister  Tomoko Ukishima also joined the tasting.

  A farmer from Kawamata Town told NHK that he will continue to  cultivate the rice now that he knows it tastes good. Because the  zone was evacuated after the nuclear crisis, he said that he had  traveled from his temporary home to the paddy fields to tend the  crops.

  Some 160,000 people escaped the vicinity of the Fukushima Daiichi  nuclear plant after an earthquake in March 2011 triggered a  tsunami that hit Japan’s coast, damaging the plant’s three  nuclear reactors. The catastrophe that hit Fukushima became the  world’s worst nuclear disaster since Chernobyl.

  Several months after the accident at the power plant in November  2011, samples of rice grown in Onami town in Fukushima Prefecture  showed radioactive contamination above the safety limit. The  grain contained caesium – a radioactive isotope – that was  measured at 630 becquerels per kilogram, while the government-set  safety limit is 500 becquerels.

Bitcoin = Drug trade? Angry US govt seeks to curb alternative currency

The renegade crypto-currency that’s used to avoid the watchful eye of financial authorities, has made history yet again. Bitcoin’s value surged past 500 dollars this weekend after months of steady growth. But as the currency is scoring more and more points it keeps raising eyebrows in Washington, as Gayane Chichakyan reports

No-Go Zone: Govt lets people home despite Fukushima radiation alarm

In Japan, a group of government officials has decided to come clean and admit that residents of Fukushima may never return to their homes. They say that radiation levels there cannot be brought back to normal any time soon and are urging the leadership to abandon its promise to make the area fit for living in. But only a handful of those residents actually want to go back – more than two years after an earthquake and tsunami crippled the Daiichi nuclear power plant.

Nascent Iodine Benefits The Govt Doesn’t Want You to Know About

Intended for human and animal use as a daily, dietary supplement, the nascent iodine in Survival Shield® may be an important part of an optimum health routine. Iodine is the mineral basis of the HPT (Hypothalamus–Pituitary–Thyroid) Axis, and many believe that the HPT Axis is the underlying basis of the HPA (Hypothalamus–Pituitary–Adrenal) Axis. http://www.infowarsshop.com/-Infowars…
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Many veterans stop receiving disability checks due to gov’t shutdown

Many veterans stop receiving disability checks due to gov’t shutdown

CENTRAL FLORIDA —

More people in central Florida are worried they will start to feel the impact of the government shutdown.
Some local military personnel have received letters that say their benefit checks will stop.
Many veterans said they depend on that money to pay for basic things, such as rent and food.
Disabled veteran Patricia Black said the government they served is now letting them down.
“To have it taken away is just unfathomable,” said Black.

Veterans storm WW II DC memorial amid govt shutdown

Veterans storm WW II DC memorial amid govt shutdown

Thousands of protesters pushed through barriers to make their way to the World War II Memorial closed under government shutdown in Washington DC. Local police donned riot gear as they tried to control the protesting veterans.

  The crowd chanted “Tear down these walls” and sang  patriotic songs in protest to the closing of monument during the  government crisis, according to local news coverage.

US veterans take part in a demonstration at the World War II Memorial in Washington, DC on October 13, 2013 demanding for an end of US federal government shutdown (AFP Photo / Jewel Samad)

 

Gov’t Shutdown Denies Military Families Money for Funerals

Gov’t Shutdown Denies Military Families Money for Funerals

DoD failed to notify Congress that they were refusing death benefits to military families

Julie Wilson Infowars.com Oct. 8, 2013

As if the public hasn’t suffered enough from the government “shutdown,” which was initiated by unnecessary political antics, now the families of fallen soldiers are literally paying the price in an unimaginable way. militarymom The Washington Times reports that at least five families, who have lost a family member in the never ending war on terror over the weekend, have been denied their death benefits.

Families of fallen soldiers typically receive a death gratuity of $100,000 within 36 hours of the soldier’s death. This government pay-out is meant to help families with funeral costs, transportation expenses and serves as a “transitional pay benefit” until the military’s survivor benefits kick in. It also allows the families to fly over the Del. Dover Air Force Base and view the coffins of their loved ones being unloaded.

This latest cut in spending has provoked outrage, causing the non-profit group “Family Communications and Logistics for Luke’s Wings,” which offers assistance to military families, to step up and take action.

The non-profit group announced they will dip into their savings to help pay for the families of fallen soldiers who wish to fly to Dover Air Force Base so that they may participate in the viewing of their loved ones’ caskets.

The non-profit organization’s manager, Jennifer Magerer, said the members of her group were “deeply saddened” by the government’s decision to cut funding for death benefits.

Last Monday Democrats actually agreed to agree with the Republicans on something when they signed a bill that guaranteed pay for active-duty military in the event of a government shutdown. However, somehow the Department of Defense (DoD) ignored this provision.