Just News – Ancient Secret Discoveries – Why Controversial Dead Sea Scrolls Have Been Hidden From Sight

 

Ancient Secret Discoveries – Why Controversial Dead Sea Scrolls Have Been Hidden From Sight

This find is the most important archaeological event in two thousand years of biblical studies. This video explains not just the Scrolls but the entire controversy surrounding them, from their initial discovery to the most recent sensational theories. Contains information about unpublished Dead Sea Scrolls with translations of key passages and recent discovery of the movement behind the Scrolls in their own words In 1947, a Bedouin shepherd stumbled upon a cave near the Dead Sea, a settlement now called Qumran, to the east of Jerusalem. This cave, along with the others located nearby, contained jars holding hundreds of scrolls and fragments of scrolls of texts both biblical and nonbiblical–in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Greek. The biblical scrolls would be the earliest evidence of the Hebrew Scriptures by hundreds of years; and the nonbiblical texts would shed dramatic light on one of the least-known periods of Jewish history.

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Health News -It’s Finally Here: Radioactive Plume From Fukushima Makes Landfall on America’s West Coast

Two-year-old girl tragically dies just two days after Christmas from eating a battery smaller than a dime
Brianna Florer died at a hospital in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Sunday
Her parents called an ambulance when she threw up blood and turned blue
The cause of the two-year-old’s death is believed to be a button battery she swallowed
While batteries often will pass through the system, they can get stuck and leak an alkaline substance which can prove fatally poisonous
By Ashley Collman For Dailymail.com
Published: 15:38 GMT, 1 January 2016

The Greek Genocide: 1914-1923.

It’s Finally Here: Radioactive Plume From Fukushima Makes Landfall on America’s West Coast
(EnviroNews Oregon) — Tillamook County, Oregon — Seaborne cesium 134, the so-called “fingerprint of Fukushima,” has been detected on US shores for the first time researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) said this month.
WHOI is a crowd-funded science seawater sampling project, that has been monitoring the radioactive plume making its way across the Pacific to America’s west coast, from the demolished Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in eastern Japan.
The seawater samples were taken from the shores of Tillamook Bay and Gold Beach, and were actually obtained in January and February of 2016 and tested later in the year.
In other strikingly similar news reported last month, researchers at the Fukushima InFORM project in Canada, led by University of Victoria chemical oceanographer Jay Cullen, said they sampled a sockeye salmon from Okanagan Lake in British Columbia that tested positive for cesium 134 as well.
Multiple other reports have circulated online, mostly in alternative media outlets, and mostly not corroborated by any tangible measurement data, that point to cases of possible radioactive contamination of Canadian salmon, but EnviroNews Oregon has not independently confirmed any of these claims.

These POLICE OFFICERS are PRAYING for people and handing out meals

WARZONE FRANCE- Muslims burn cars and drive out Native French from no-go zones. France has 751 no-go zones.
IMPORTANT NOTE- FB is trying to block many Conservative users from sharing. Please report under the video if you are having issue

Greek Mythology: God and Goddesses – Documentary

Greek Mythology is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece and is part of religion in modern Greece and around the world, known as Hellenismos. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to throw light on the religious and political institutions of Ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1]

Greek mythology is explicitly embodied in a large collection of narratives, and implicitly in Greek representational arts, such as vase-paintings and votive gifts. Greek myth attempts to explain the origins of the world, and details the lives and adventures of a wide variety of gods, goddesses, heroes, heroines, and mythological creatures. These accounts initially were disseminated in an oral-poetic tradition; today the Greek myths are known primarily from Greek literature.

The oldest known Greek literary sources, Homer’s epic poems Iliad and Odyssey, focus on events surrounding the Trojan War. Two poems by Homer’s near contemporary Hesiod, the Theogony and the Works and Days, contain accounts of the genesis of the world, the succession of divine rulers, the succession of human ages, the origin of human woes, and the origin of sacrificial practices. Myths are also preserved in the Homeric Hymns, in fragments of epic poems of the Epic Cycle, in lyric poems, in the works of the tragedians of the fifth century BC, in writings of scholars and poets of the Hellenistic Age, and in texts from the time of the Roman Empire by writers such as Plutarch and Pausanias.

Archaeological findings provide a principal source of detail about Greek mythology, with gods and heroes featured prominently in the decoration of many artifacts. Geometric designs on pottery of the eighth century BC depict scenes from the Trojan cycle as well as the adventures of Heracles. In the succeeding Archaic, Classical, and Hellenistic periods, Homeric and various other mythological scenes appear, supplementing the existing literary evidence.[2] Greek mythology has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language. Poets and artists from ancient times to the present have derived inspiration from Greek mythology and have discovered contemporary significance and relevance in the themes.