Malaria drug causes brain damage that mimics PTSD: case study

Malaria drug causes brain damage that mimics PTSD: case study

The case of a service member diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder but found instead to have brain damage caused by a malaria drug raises questions about the origin of similar symptoms in other post-9/11 veterans.
According to the case study published online in Drug Safety Case Reports in June, a U.S. military member sought treatment at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, for uncontrolled anger, insomnia, nightmares and memory loss.
The once-active sailor, who ran marathons and deployed in 2009 to East Africa, reported stumbling frequently, arguing with his family and needing significant support from his staff while on the job due to cognitive issues.
Physicians diagnosed the service member with anxiety, PTSD and a thiamine deficiency. But after months of treatment, including medication, behavioral therapy and daily doses of vitamins, little changed.
The patient continued to be hobbled by his symptoms, eventually leaving the military on a medical discharge and questioning his abilities to function or take care of his children.

Use of ‘control’ vaccines and mismatched groups expose malaria study as complete fraud

Mismatched group sizes suggest that children who receive malaria vaccine are actually more likely to contract malaria than control children
Then there is the issue of mismatched group sizes. According to the data, 57 of 2,830 children in the RTS,S group developed at least one episode of severe malaria following the vaccine, while only 56 of 1,466 children in the “control” group did. As you can see, the number of children in the RTS,S malaria vaccine group was nearly double the amount in the “control” group.

Study authors used these figures to suggest that RTS,S has an efficacy rate of 47.3 percent, and the mainstream media ran with it. But if the two group sizes had been the same, it appears as though children in the “control” group were actually better protected from malaria than children in the malaria vaccine group. By nearly doubling the size of the RTS,S group, study authors were able to arrive at an artificial efficacy rate that favored the malaria vaccine.

These are just a few of the many details that the mainstream media failed to carefully evaluate prior to jumping on the pro-malaria vaccine bandwagon, but they are details we here at NaturalNews simply could not ignore. The basic truth of the matter is that nothing has been proven by this study other than the fact that GSK and the Gates Foundation appear to have a clear agenda to get the RTS,S malaria vaccine approved, regardless of whether or not it actually safe and effective.

Read more at:

http://www.naturalnews.com/054047_malaria_vaccines_scientific_studies_control_group.html