GenSix Productions – Q-CAST: The Mars Earth Connection

Q-CAST: February 20, 2017. Steve discusses the Mars Earth connection. Steve quotes both Ignatius L. Donnelly, author of “Atlantis: The Antediluvian World and the legendary works of the late author David Flynn, a renown genius and arguably the most expert researcher of our time concerning the mysteries of Mars and the Mars Earth connection phenomenon. Was there life on Mars? Is there life on Mars? Are there secret bases on Mars?

Aliens & Fallen Angels
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TRUE LEGENDS THE DOCUMENTARY FILM SERIES
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Space News – Is Phobos an artificial structure?

“Strange Signal” –Picked Up By NASA’s Cassini Spacecraft at South Pole of Saturn’s Enceladus Revealed Hidden Global Ocean (WATCH Today’s “Galaxy” Stream)
February 19, 2017
The odd signal Cassini detected didn’t reveal a frozen, airless body. Instead, it looked something like a comet that was actively emitting gas. The magnetometer detected that Saturn’s magnetic field, which envelops Enceladus, was perturbed above the moon’s south pole in a way that didn’t make sense for an inactive world. Could it be that the moon was actively replenishing gases it was breathing into space?
On Feb. 17, 2005, the Cassini Mission spacecraft’s magnetometer instrument noticed something odd making the first-ever close pass over Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Since NASA’s two Voyager spacecraft made their distant flybys of Saturn’s moon Enceladus about 20 years prior, JPL scientists in 2005 had anticipated the little moon would be an interesting place to visit with the Cassini Mission. Enceladus is bright white—the most reflective object in the solar system, in fact—and it orbits in the middle of a faint ring of dust-sized ice particles known as Saturn’s E ring. Scientists speculated ice dust was being kicked off its surface somehow. But they presumed it would be, essentially, a dead, airless ball of ice.

A REGION ON MARS WITH RECENT WATER IS ABOUT TO GET MAJOR ATTENTION
Article Updated: 18 Feb , 2017 by Bob King
Researcher Dr. Mary Bourke from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a patch of land in an ancient valley in Mars’ Lucaya Crater that appears to have held water in the not-too-distant past, making it a prime target to search for past life forms on the Red Planet. Signs of water past and present pop up everywhere on Mars from now-dry, wriggly riverbeds snaking across arid plains to water ice exposed at the poles during the Martian summer.

Study – Valley floor aeolianite in an equatorial pit crater on Mars
Authors
M. C. Bourke,
H. A. Viles
First published: 20 December 2016
Abstract
High and low albedo lineations in a valley entering a pit in Lucaya crater are overlain by a currently immobile dune field. We propose that they are an aeolianite that formed as the overlying dunes migrated. Implicit in this is the suggestion that available water promoted early cementation of evaporitic minerals. We propose that the deposit likely resulted from a combination of locally sourced carbonate minerals and transient groundwater, both of which were made available after the formation of the pit crater. We do not exclude other aerial or subsurface sources of soluble minerals. We report on a pilot regional reconnaissance of images that finds the alternating albedo of dune sediments in Lucaya crater is found elsewhere on Mars. This suggests a regional sediment source at the time of dune activity. We examine a coastal interdune site in Namibia as an analogue for early geochemical cementation and interdune microtopography similar to the features observed on Mars. We find that the curvilinear interdune strata at the field site in Namibia are the preserved lee slope facies deposited by the dune as it migrated. Early cementation occurs in the interdune vadose zone due to precipitation of salts from groundwater. The formation of aeolianite in Lucaya crater supports suggestions by others that moisture is available for a significant period following crater formation. Moreover, it suggests that groundwater flow is sustained near the surface as well as in the deeper subsurface.

Is Phobos an artificial structure?
Soviet Air Force Colonel Marina Popovich has gone on record stating that Phobos, one of the two Martian moons, is an artificial structure.
She gave this information to CSETI’s International Director, Dr. Steven Greer. Her sources also advised that it is hollow. The credentials of Marina Popovich are second to none.
A Ph.D. from the University of Leningrad, and graduate of the Military Flight school. At the peak of her career she set over 100 aviation records, of which 90 still stand unbroken. Her contacts on the subject stem from her former husband being the first man to rendezvous with another spacecraft in orbit, during the Vostok 4 flight, in August 1962.
Phobos has itself always been considered a rather mysterious object, as has its smaller twin, Deimos. Joseph Shklovskii, a member of the Soviet Academy of science, calculated from the estimated density of the Martian atmosphere, and the “acceleration” of Phobos, that the moon must be hollow. Evidence for this arose in July 1988, when the Russians launched two unmanned planetary probes (Phobos 1 and Phobos 2).
Phobos 1 was lost en route two months later, reportedly because of a radio command error. Phobos 2 was also lost under the most intriguing circumstances, but not before it had beamed back certain images, and information from the planet Mars itself. Phobos 2 arrived safely at Mars in January 1989.
It entered into orbit around Mars as the first step towards its ultimate goal: to transfer to an orbit that would make it fly almost in tandem with the Martian moonlet called Phobos, and explore the moon with equipment that included two packages of instruments to be placed on the surface of the moon Phobos.
The mission was successful until Phobos 2 aligned itself with the Martian Moon. Then, on the 28th March, the Soviet mission control center acknowledged sudden communication “problems” with the spacecraft. Tass, the official Soviet news agency, reported that “Phobos 2 had failed to communicate with Earth, as scheduled, after completing an operation yesterday around the Martin moon Phobos.
Scientists at mission control have been unable to establish radio contact.” The probe revealed anomalies on the surface of Mars (heat radiation leakage, in a perfect geometrical shape running parallel one to one another directly along the equator, and the Face on Mars).
Another anomaly was also found one of the last transmissions from Phobos 2. It was a photograph of a gigantic cylindrical object – a huge, approximately 20km long, 1.5km diameter cigar-shaped ’mother ship’, that was photographed on the 25th March 1989. hanging or packed next to the Martian moon Phobos by the Soviet unmanned probe Phobos.
After that last frame was radio-transmitted back to Earth, the probe mysteriously disappeared; according to the Russians it was destroyed – possibly knocked out with an energy pulse beam.
So what was it that collided or crashed into Phobos 2?
Was the space probe shot out of space for “seeing too much”?
What does the last secret frame show?
Popovich was associated with the controversial frames being ’smuggled’ out of top secret files, and although they have not been publicly released, it is believed however, that the frames have been shown to US and British officials.
The cigar shaped craft in the penultimate frame taken by Phobos 2, is apparently the object casting the oblong shadow on the surface of Mars in an earlier photo.
In October 1989, Soviet scientists published a series of technical reports on the experiments Phobos 2 did manage to conduct. The report confirms that the spacecraft was spinning, either because of a computer malfunction, or because Phobos 2 was “impacted” by an unknown object shortly before contact was lost.

How to visit Mars on Earth

 

This article was taken from the September 2013 issue of Wired magazine. Be the first to read Wired’s articles in print before they’re posted online, and get your hands on loads of additional content by subscribing online.

Kim Binsted has already been to Mars — or a version of it. In 2007, the University of Hawaii artificial-intelligence professor flew to the Canadian High Arctic to live with six other researchers for four months in a Mars-analogue environment. Part of a study run by the Mars Society, it tested the extreme psychological factors that come into play on long-duration space missions: sleep changes, isolation, stress, fragile group-dynamics and more. Now, Binsted is overseeing her own Nasa-funded Mars simulation in Hawaii, in which a team will go on four “missions” over the next three years. Here’s how she checks for the right stuff, while staying here on Earth.

 

Isolate yourself from all other humans Binsted’s Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation, dubbed HI-SEAS, is situated 2,600 metres up on the jagged, red slopes of the Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii. The lava desert is completely isolated — with little plant life and no ocean visible in the distance — recreating the experience of staring out on to a vast expanse of red rubble on the surface of Mars. The only real human contact the “astronauts” have is with each other. Internet correspondence with “mission support” is delayed by the Mars-Earth 18-minute difference.

Get used to breathing recycled air Constantly confined astronauts on Mars quickly forget the feeling of fresh air. So when leaving their roughly 92-square-metre geodesic dome habitat to conduct geological fieldwork on-site — part of their job to scientifically characterise the area — the HI-SEAS crew strap into hazmat suits redesigned to have the look and (encumbering) feel of space suits. To do this, Binsted found Jessica Cruzan, a designer with the Hawaii Maker Group. Cruzan made the suits inflatable — giving the bulk of a real spacesuit without adding excess weight.

Spice up your space food with extra ingredients Eating the same meals for months on end causes a space-flight phenomenon called “menu fatigue” — astronauts lose interest in food, either because gravity changes their sense of taste, or as a side effect of boredom. Some return to Earth malnourished. On their first mission, HI-SEAS compared two broad kinds of foods: pre-prepared Nasa fare, and a variety of shelf-stable, freeze-dried ingredients. “If you send up lasagne, it will always be lasagne,” Binsted says. Sending ingredients allows the crew to prepare what they’d like to eat.

Experiment with gravity changes To complement the food tests conducted on HI-SEAS’s first mission, a separate Nasa centre in Galveston, Texas, measured the effects of gravity on the perception of smell and taste by having participants lie in bed with their feet slightly raised — for 70 days. Such “bedrest” facilities simulate the physiological effects that changes in gravity impart on the human body, such as muscle wastage. Ultimately, though, Binsted says, “You can’t make the perfect analogue; the only perfect analogue is Mars itself.”