Keiser Report: Banksters aka Tongue Eating Isopods (E531)

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the absurd tongue eating isopod sitting in the middle of the global financial system and what the system would look like with that parasite ripped out of the host economy. They look at Iceland and Kenya where parasites are being banished with old debt repudiation ideas and with revolutionary new crypto payment systems. In the second half, Max interviews futurist, IT architect and Free Software advocate, Arjen Kamphuis, about the internet in a post re-architected NSA world in which the free network is disintegrating but against which the likes of Google, Oracle and Microsoft are leveraged. They add up the costs to US corporations in lost revenue as nations across Europe and Latin America divorce themselves from industrial espionage on an industrial scale from America.

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Microsoft Denies Monitoring Skype Calls After Banning Users For Bad Language

Microsoft Denies Monitoring Skype Calls After Banning Users For Bad Language

Company suspends accounts of foul-mouthed Xbox gamers

Paul Joseph Watson
Infowars.com
November 27, 2013

After it was revealed that Microsoft was suspending the Skype accounts of Xbox gamers who used bad language, the company was forced to deny that it was monitoring Skype conversations.

Xbox users complained that Microsoft was banning them from using Skype or the Xbox Upload Studio because of “past behavior.” The censorship stemmed from the company targeting people who used bad language in their uploaded videos.

“Kinect likes to listen to you. It’s a big part of the console’s appeal. But it doesn’t like to hear your swears. At least not in Upload Studio, the Xbox One service that lets you share gameplay clips (with non-profane voiceover!) with friends, and save those clips to your SkyDrive. If you’ve got a dirty mouth, you can run into trouble,” reports Gizmodo.

Some Xbox users expressed concern at why Microsoft was applying the ban to Skype accounts when accessed via the Xbox console, leading to fears that the company was monitoring their private conversations, prompting a statement from Microsoft;

“To be clear, the Xbox Live Policy & Enforcement team does not monitor direct peer-to-peer communications like Skype chats and calls. Also, we take Code of Conduct moderation via Upload Studio very seriously. We want a clean, safe and fun environment for all users. Excessive profanity as well as other Code of Conduct violations will be enforced upon and result in suspension of some or all privileges on Xbox Live. We remain committed to preserving and promoting a safe, secure and enjoyable experience for all of our Xbox Live members.”

However, a respondent to the Gizmodo article points out that one of the bans was applied for someone solely using Skype, remarking, “So yes they are listening, or someone complained about the persons behavior.”

 

Mondelez International May Use Microsoft Kinect to Track Your Snack Buying Habits

Mondelez International May Use Microsoft Kinect to Track Your Snack Buying Habits

It’s a dance many of us have experienced in the grocery store: You grab a package of cookies, weigh the consequences of eating them, hesitantly put them back on the shelf and slowly walk away.

 Yet you still stare longingly at those cookies, thinking about a snack relationship that could have been.

 The ritual may now be video-recorded for quality assurance, thanks to a new Mondelez International program called Smart Shelf. The program uses Kinect for Windows, a Microsoft program available for other developers to use its motion-tracking technology. Mondelez is using it to track shoppers as they look at various Mondelez-associated brands, such as Triscuit, Ritz and Oreo.

 “Our goal is to understand how shoppers see, scan, spot, show interest and select products from the shelf in the store,” said a spokeswoman for Mondelez. “We can also engage and influence the purchase decision by delivering a targeted shopper experience. For example, we can deliver audio or play a video based on demographics, distance and even the time of the day.”

 Mondelez isn’t the first company to experiment with targeted advertising. The EyeSee Mannequin, released by Almax last year, used both cameras and microphones to track how people behaved in department stores. They were also capable of sending data to department stores and retail brands, similar to how Smart Shelf is capable of sending data back to Mondelez.

 Richard Buino, another spokesman for Mondelez, said that a customer’s privacy is a big concern for the company, and that Smart Shelf would not infringe upon it.