‘NSA’s goal is elimination of privacy worldwide’ – Greenwald to EU (FULL SPEECH)

The NSA’s ultimate goal is to destroy individual privacy worldwide, working with its UK sidekick GCHQ, journalist Glenn Greenwald warned an EU inquiry, adding that they were far ahead of their rivals in their “ability to destroy privacy.” READ MORE: http://on.rt.com/dgt0n5

Putin: I envy Obama, because he can spy and get away with it

I envy Obama because he can spy on his allies without any consequences, said Putin when asked about how his relations had changed with the US following Snowden’s espionage revelations. READ MORE: http://on.rt.com/q66cm7

Keiser Report: Banksters aka Tongue Eating Isopods (E531)

In this episode of the Keiser Report, Max Keiser and Stacy Herbert discuss the absurd tongue eating isopod sitting in the middle of the global financial system and what the system would look like with that parasite ripped out of the host economy. They look at Iceland and Kenya where parasites are being banished with old debt repudiation ideas and with revolutionary new crypto payment systems. In the second half, Max interviews futurist, IT architect and Free Software advocate, Arjen Kamphuis, about the internet in a post re-architected NSA world in which the free network is disintegrating but against which the likes of Google, Oracle and Microsoft are leveraged. They add up the costs to US corporations in lost revenue as nations across Europe and Latin America divorce themselves from industrial espionage on an industrial scale from America.

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Yahoo vows to encrypt all its users’ personal data

Yahoo vows to encrypt all its users’ personal data

SAN FRANCISCO    (AP) — Yahoo is expanding its efforts to protect its users’ online activities from prying eyes by encrypting all the communications and other information flowing into the Internet company’s data centers around the world.

The commitment announced Monday by Yahoo Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer follows a recent Washington Post report that the National Security Agency has been hacking into the communications lines of the data centers run by Yahoo and Google Inc. to intercept information about what people do and say online.

Yahoo had previously promised to encrypt its email service by early January. Now, the Sunnyvale, Calif., company plans to have all data encrypted by the end of March to make it more difficult for unauthorized parties to decipher the information.

Google began to encrypt its Gmail service in 2010 and has since introduced the security measure on many other services. The Mountain View, Calif., company has promised to encrypt the links to its data centers, too. A Google engineer said that task had been completed in a post on his Google Plus account earlier this month, but the company hasn’t yet confirmed all the encryption work is done.

Other documents leaked to various media outlets by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden this year have revealed that Yahoo, Google and several other prominent technology companies, including Microsoft Corp., Facebook Inc. and Apple Inc., have been feeding the U.S. government some information about their international users under a court-monitored program called PRISM. The companies maintain they have only surrendered data about a very small number of users, and have only cooperated when legally required.

The NSA says its online surveillance programs have played an instrumental role in thwarting terrorism.

The increased use of encryption technology is aimed at stymieing government surveillance that may be occurring without the companies’ knowledge. Even when it’s encrypted, online data can still be heisted, but the information looks like gibberish without the decoding keys.

“I want to reiterate what we have said in the past: Yahoo has never given access to our data centers to the NSA or to any other government agency,” Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer wrote in a Monday post on the company’s Tumblr blog.

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Businesses and governments worldwide seek to evade NSA spying

Businesses and governments worldwide seek to evade NSA spying

Private telecom providers, businesses and governments are increasingly compelled to move or reinforce web operations following disclosures of the NSA’s mass internet surveillance programs made by whistleblower Edward Snowden.

Brazil is set to vote on the creation of a cyber-security system to thwart  National Security Agency espionage of Brazilian government  systems. US surveillance led by the NSA had infiltrated the  highest levels of Brazil’s administration.

The largest telecom provider in Germany, the formerly-state-run  Deutsche Telekom, is seeking to keep their service in-country, out of the  reach of foreign spying.

But much smaller internet companies are also feeling the need,  based on customer demand and common sense, to move their servers  out of the reach of the NSA and the United States’ partners in  global surveillance, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the UK –   the “Five Eyes.”

Encrypted-communications provider Unseen, for instance, has  recently moved its servers and bank accounts from the US to  Iceland, based on the NSA’s vast reach and the Nordic country’s  commitment to privacy rights.