STUDY: Lack Of Vaccines Among Many Reasons Amish Rarely Get Cancer

STUDY: Lack Of Vaccines Among Many Reasons Amish Rarely Get Cancer
The case of the Amish is a strange one. The Amish have a lower rate of smokers, but a 2010 study expressing the astoundingly low presence of cancer in the Ohio Amish even admitted that smoking played only a small role in the matter.
Conclusion:
Cancer incidence is low in the Ohio Amish. These data strongly support reduction of cancer incidence by tobacco abstinence but cannot be explained solely on this basis. Understanding these contributions may help to identify additional important factors to target to reduce cancer among the non-Amish.
So then why don’t the Amish suffer from the throes of cancer as much as the rest of the surrounding western world?
For starters, the Amish don’t vaccinate their population. They rarely ever have cases of Autism and cancer. The Amish have refused government intimidation over the matter and have continued to skirt neurological and degenerative disease.
The Amish eat organic foods. These aren’t people who are cruising the middle aisles of the local grocery store. They have farms and organic markets. Their land is protected and unchurned by Monsanto’s poisonous seeding.
Other factors, such as increased physical activity and lower stress lifestyles also contribute to lower rates of cancer, but the core takeaway is without question the lack of vaccines and the lack of processed foods. These are factors that aren’t out of our own control, as pharma might have us all believe. Instead, the Amish offer us great insight into exactly how we can control our own destinies. They show us we don’t have to rely on pharma’s harsh “treatments,” rather, our own lifestyle changes are the cure we seek.

Study – Low cancer incidence rates in Ohio Amish.
RESULTS:
The age-adjusted cancer incidence rate for all cancers among the Amish adults was 60% of the age-adjusted adult rate in Ohio (389.5/10(5) vs. 646.9/10(5); p < 0.0001). The incidence rate for tobacco-related cancers in the Amish was 37% of the rate for Ohio adults (p < 0.0001). The incidence rate for non-tobacco-related cancers in the Amish was 72% of the age-adjusted adult rate in Ohio (p = 0.0001).
CONCLUSION:
Cancer incidence is low in the Ohio Amish. These data strongly support reduction of cancer incidence by tobacco abstinence but cannot be explained solely on this basis. Understanding these contributions may help to identify additional important factors to target to reduce cancer among the non-Amish.

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Ohio Senate Passes Bill to Ban All Abortions After an Unborn Baby’s Heartbeat Begins

Ohio Senate Passes Bill to Ban All Abortions After an Unborn Baby’s Heartbeat Begins
The Ohio State Senate today passed legislation that would ban all abortions after an unborn baby’s heart begins to beat. An unborn child’s heart begins to beat at 22 days after conception or earlier.
Should the measure be approved by the full Ohio State Legislature and be signed into law, the legislation would likely be struck down in court as has been the case and two other states — Arkansas and North Dakota.
As the Ohio General Assembly considers bills in these last days of lame duck session before the year’s end, significant amendments are being added to various laws to pass additional legislation. Today the Ohio Senate added Ohio’s Unborn Heartbeat Protection bill, which has been before the legislature for several years, as an amendment to House Bill 493 child abuse reporting law. The Senate has approved H.B. 493 with Heartbeat protection amendment 21-10.
H.B. 493 with the heartbeat protection amendment now goes to the Ohio House of Representatives for concurrence and that chamber could take a vote as early as today. Then, if approved, the bill goes to pro-life Governor John Kasich for his potential signature.
“Cincinnati Right to Life, the entire statewide Ohio pro-life coalition, and all else who have supported the Unborn Heartbeat Protection bill the past several years thanks and congratulates the Ohio Senate on this momentous vote,” said Paula Westwood, Executive Director, Right to Life of Greater Cincinnati. “We look forward to passage of H.B. 493 with Heartbeat protection amendment in the Ohio House, and Governor Kasich’s immediate support.”