Calcium Chloride in Vaccines

Calcium Chloride in Vaccines: Limited Information Available
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Vaccine Excipient and Media Summary lists two vaccines that contain calcium chloride:

  • Rotavirus (Rotarix) approved for use in infants six weeks to 24 weeks of age
  • Influenza (Afluria) approved for use in persons over the age of nine

Calcium Chloride: Materials Safety Record and Toxicity
According to the Materials and Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) on ScienceLab.com, calcium chloride is hazardous in case of skin contact (irritant), eye contact (irritant), ingestion and inhalation. The MSDS does not address the effects of calcium chloride through injection. Toxicological information is provided by the MSDS, which describes the biological effects of calcium chloride on humans as:
Mutagenic for mammalian somatic cells, mutagenic for bacteria and/or yeast and may cause damage to the following organs: heart, cardiovascular system. May affect genetic material based on animal data. May cause cancer (tumorigenic) based on animal data.11
The MSDS further provides these special remarks of its effects on humans:
Skin: May cause severe irritation and possible burns, especially if skin is wet. Contact with dry skin causes mild irritation. Contact of solid with moist/wet skin or skin contact with strong solutions may cause marked irritation or possible burns.
Eyes: May cause severe irritation, possible transient corneal injury, and possible eye burns.
Inhalation: May cause severe irritation of the upper respiratory tract with pain, inflammation and possible burns.
Ingestion: May cause severe gastrointestinal (digestive) tract irritation with nausea, vomiting and possible burns. May affect cardiovascular system (cardiac disturbances, slow heart beat), behavior (seizures), metabolism, blood, and brain, respiration (rapid respiration).
Chronic Potential Health Effects: Effects may be delayed.11
Calcium Chloride: Lack of Scientific Research on Human Health

Advertisements

Too Big To Fail Banks Are Taking Over As Number Of U.S. Banks Falls To All-Time Record Low

Too Big To Fail Banks Are Taking Over As Number Of U.S. Banks Falls To All-Time Record Low

The too big to fail banks have a larger share of the U.S. banking industry than they have ever had before.  So if having banks that were too big to fail was a “problem” back in 2008, what is it today?  As you will read about below, the total number of banks in the United States has fallen to a brand new all-time record low and that means that the health of the too big to fail banks is now more critical to our economy than ever.  In 1985, there were more than 18,000 banks in the United States.  Today, there are only 6,891 left, and that number continues to drop every single year.  That means that more than 10,000 U.S. banks have gone out of existence since 1985.  Meanwhile, the too big to fail banks just keep on getting even bigger.  In fact, the six largest banks in the United States (JPMorgan Chase, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley) have collectively gotten 37 percent larger over the past five years.  If even one of those banks collapses, it would be absolutely crippling to the U.S. economy.  If several of them were to collapse at the same time, it could potentially plunge us into an economic depression unlike anything that this nation has ever seen before.

Incredibly, there were actually more banks in existence back during the days of the Great Depression than there is today.  According to the Wall Street Journal, the federal government has been keeping track of the number of banks since 1934 and this year is the very first time that the number has fallen below 7,000…

Heroin Capital: Afghan opium sets global drug supply record

Opium farmers in Afghanistan are expecting a record harvest this year – bringing huge profits for warlords and heroin traffickers. Poppy production continues to spread at a staggering pace, with some growers claiming government officials are taking a cut from the lucrative business. Let’s cross live now to Kabul, to talk to Jean-Luc Lemahieu – he’s the head of the UN drug control agency in Afghanistan and neighboring countries.

2013 Wintertime Arctic Sea Ice Maximum Fifth Lowest on Record

2013 Wintertime Arctic Sea Ice Maximum Fifth Lowest on Record

Last September, at the end of the northern hemisphere summer, the Arctic Ocean’s icy cover shrank to its lowest extent on record, continuing a long-term trend and diminishing to about half the size of the average summertime extent from 1979 to 2000.

During the cold and dark of Arctic winter, sea ice refreezes and achieves its maximum extent, usually in late February or early March. According to a NASA analysis, this year the annual maximum extent was reached on Feb. 28 and it was the fifth lowest sea ice winter extent in the past 35 years.

The new maximum -5.82 million square miles (15.09 million square kilometers)- is in line with a continuing trend in declining winter Arctic sea ice extent: nine of the ten smallest recorded maximums have occurred during the last decade. The 2013 winter extent is 144,402 square miles (374,000 square kilometers) below the average annual maximum extent for the last three decades.