Retracted paper linking HPV vaccine to behavioral issues republished after revisions

Retracted paper linking HPV vaccine to behavioral issues republished after revisions
A retracted study linking the vaccine for human papillomavirus (HPV) to behavioral problems in mice has been republished by a different journal.
The paper has been significantly revised, an author told us, but it still comes the same conclusions.
In February, the journal Vaccine temporarily removed the study without explanation, and told the authors the editor had asked for further review. Later that month, Vaccine retracted the paper, citing “serious concerns regarding the scientific soundness of the article,” and “seriously flawed” methodology.
In July, another journal — Immunologic Research — republished the paper. The new version of the paper has been significantly changed, co-author Christopher Shaw from the University of British Columbia (UBC) told Retraction Watch:
Much of [the] original paper that was retracted from Vaccine was revised based on the comments of the second set of reviewers for Vaccine that we found of value.
As we previously reported, the previous version of the paper, “Behavioral abnormalities in young female mice following administration of aluminum adjuvants and the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil,” (which has been removed entirely by Vaccine), said:
It appears that Gardasil via its Al adjuvant and HPV antigens has the ability to trigger neuroinflammation and autoimmune reactions, further leading to behavioral changes.
The new paper in Immunologic Research, “Behavioral abnormalities in female mice following administration of aluminum adjuvants and the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine Gardasil,” contains the same sentence in its abstract.
Furthermore, in the new version of the study, the authors conclude:
…both Al and Gardasil vaccine injections resulted in behavioral abnormalities in mice…
Shaw added that the new paper has been peer reviewed again, but said he had not seen the referees’ comments, referring us to the study’s last and corresponding author, Yehuda Shoenfeld, based at Tel-Aviv University in Israel.

Republished study: long-term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize

Republished study: long-term toxicity of a Roundup herbicide and a Roundup-tolerant genetically modified maize

The health effects of a Roundup-tolerant NK603 genetically modified (GM) maize (from 11% in the diet), cultivated with or without Roundup application and Roundup alone (from 0.1 ppb of the full pesticide containing glyphosate and adjuvants) in drinking water, were evaluated for 2 years in rats. This study constitutes a follow-up investigation of a 90-day feeding study conducted by Monsanto in order to obtain commercial release of this GMO, employing the same rat strain and analyzing biochemical parameters on the same number of animals per group as our investigation. Our research represents the first chronic study on these substances, in which all observations including tumors are reported chronologically. Thus, it was not designed as a carcinogenicity study. We report the major findings with 34 organs observed and 56 parameters analyzed at 11 time points for most organs.

More at:

http://www.enveurope.com/content/26/1/14

or:

http://www.gmoseralini.org/republication-seralini-study-science-speaks/