The flu vaccine may have a strange problem that US scientists can’t fix

Getting a flu shot every year? More may not be better
If you’ve been diligent about getting your flu shot every year, you may not want to read this. But a growing body of evidence indicates that more may not always be better.
The evidence, which is confounding some researchers, suggests that getting flu shots repeatedly can gradually reduce the effectiveness of the vaccines under some circumstances.
That finding is worrying public health officials in the US, who have been urging everyone to get a flu shot each year — and who still believe an annual vaccination is better than skipping the vaccines altogether.

The flu vaccine may have a strange problem that US scientists can’t fix
researchers are concerned about what appears to be a troubling trend: Repeated vaccinations against the flu might make the newest shot less effective than the last, Helen Branswell reports at Stat.
When researchers followed 328 households during the 2010-2011 flu season, they found — much to their surprise — that the only people who really seemed to benefit from immunization were the ones who hadn’t gotten a flu shot the year before. These “unexpected findings … require further study,” the researchers wrote, in 2013.
A larger and more robust study, published last year in Clinical Infectious Diseases, added more evidence that the 2013 study was onto something important. Researchers followed more than 7,000 people for eight yearly flu seasons, and they learned people got the strongest protection against the flu only when they were vaccinated for the current season — and at no other time during the previous five years.

Woman dies of sepsis after getting flu shot; CDC claims it as flu death, urges public to get vaccinated
(NaturalNews) A Wisconsin radiology technician who was recently forced by her employer to get a flu shot died just days later after contracting sepsis, according to reports. Katie McQuestion, a 26-year-old from Kenosha, reportedly took the jab in compliance with her hospital’s demands, resulting in a rapid progression from good health to severe illness to gruesome death.
Almost immediately after getting a flu shot, Katie began to feel ill with the flu, she initially reported to her loved ones. The otherwise healthy, spry young woman who had no previous medical conditions suddenly developed flu-like symptoms during a trip out to shop for dresses with her mother on December 29. Katie was engaged to be married.
“She was the picture of health,” stated the girl’s mother, who wished to remain anonymous, to ABC News. “No 29-year-old should have to bury his wife,” she added in reference to McQuestion’s fiancee.
Katie told her mother flu shot made her sicker than she had ever been
One day after visiting the dress shop, Katie was sent home from work because her condition was worsening. On the following day, New Year’s Eve, Katie’s mother went to pick up a prescription for her, which didn’t help any as Katie’s health declined ever-further.

TORONTO – A strange vaccine-related phenomenon spotted at the start of the 2009 flu pandemic may well have been real, a new study suggests.

http://www.metronews.ca/life/health/2012/09/09/canadian-problem-maybe-not-study-finds.html

Canadian researchers noticed in the early weeks of the pandemic that people who got a flu shot for the 2008-2009 winter seemed to be more likely to get infected with the pandemic virus than people who hadn’t received a flu shot.
Five studies done in several provinces showed the same puzzling and unsettling results. But initially research outside of Canada did not, and the effect was dismissed as “the Canadian problem.”
News of the unexpected findings broke at a time when countries in North America and parts of Europe were getting ready to start vaccinating their populations against the pandemic virus.

Japan Physician: I hope adults will leave Tokyo, not just children — Strange things happening — Medications don’t seem to work — Rare diseases increasing dramatically (VIDEO)

Japan Physician: I hope adults will leave Tokyo, not just children — Strange things happening — Medications don’t seem to work — Rare diseases increasing dramatically (VIDEO)

he Mita clinic in Kodaira city, Tokyo, has carried out blood examination and thyroid ultrasound examination on 1,500 patients, including children. Mamarevo Magazine here interviews Dr. Mita, the head of the clinic, about what he has seen through the blood exam.

http://momsrevo.blogspot.jp/2013/09/no6.html

http://enenews.com/japan-physician-i-hope-adults-will-evacuate-tokyo-not-just-children-strange-things-happening-medications-dont-seem-to-work-rare-diseases-increasing-dramatically-video

What is a ‘differential white blood cell count’? What can we learn from checking it?

 Q: Please tell us about the examinations that are conducted by the Mita clinic. 

 A: Since October 2011, we have carried out blood examinations, which include ‘differential white blood cell count’, and thyroid ultrasound examinations. The WBC (white blood cells) consist of 5 different kinds of cells: neutrophil, lymphocyte, eosinocyte, basophil, and monocyte. The ‘differential WBC count’ consists of comparing the ratio of occurrence between these five cell types. Workers who work in environments with high radiation levels have to take ‘ionized radiation health checks’, which particularly focus on ‘differential WBC count’.

In the current situation, thyroid ultrasound examinations have been getting a lot of attention, but I consider differential WBC count to be rather important as well, for assessing the effects of radiation.

 Q: Do you mean that we can understand the impact of radiation on humans by checking differential WBC count?

 Mita: Yes. Blood is produced in the bone marrow which is one of the organs that are most vulnerable to radiation. If the bone marrow is exposed to high doses of radiation, the quality and ratio of blood corpuscle cells can be changed. The values of differential WBC count can be affected easily by even tiny inflammation in the body. So, in our clinic, we first take a close look at patient’s condition such as the symptom of inflammation and liver function. If a patient is diagnosed with such conditions, we ask him/her to undergo the blood examination only after full recovery.

 It is possible to see tendencies of areas by evaluating the data of hundreds and thousands of people.

 So, if the mean value of the result of the collective blood exams is not very good, it can indicate the need for decision-making of whether one should keep living in the area.

By the way, in the ongoing Fukushima Health Management Survey in Fukushima prefecture, the differential WBC counts have been conducted only on residents who have resided in the evacuation zone. But I think that all the residents in Northern Kanto and Metropolitan Tokyo areas should be encouraged to take this examination.

 Q:  You have found changes in the children’s differential WBC counts. Could you tell us about it?

 Mita: Yes. Our patients mostly come from Tokyo, Chiba, Kanagawa, Saitama, and other Northern Kanto areas. I have found an obvious decline of neutrophil value in leukocyte (WBC) of these children.

 The pediatricians’ general textbook says that reference value of neutrophil for healthy children (6-12 years old) is between 3000 and 5000.  3000 is considered as the threshold value. But the mean number of neutrophil values of the children who have visited our clinics since the accident has decreased to 2500. The mean value should normally be 4000, but it has shifted to 2500.  It is lower than the threshold value of 3000. I think this points at a serious problem.

Strange bedfellows: Italy’s budget crisis unites jobless youth and big business

Strange bedfellows: Italy’s budget crisis unites jobless youth and big business

Public unrest in Italy, fueled by the new budget rolled out by the shaky ruling coalition, has united unemployed youth and the captains of industry in opposition, James Walston, an Italian politics expert from the American University of Rome, told RT.

  Violent clashes broke out between police and demonstrators in  Rome on Saturday as up to 70,000 took to the streets to protest  Italy’s new budget.

  Earlier this week, Prime Minister Enrico Letta – who leads the  unstable Left-Right coalition – presented the 2014 budget, which  immediately came under fire from both sides of the coalition.

  The left criticized the budget for freezing state sector pay and  pensions, while the right and big-business said it failed to  stimulate growth with insufficient cuts to Italy’s oppressive  corporate taxes.

  Walston says that attempts to balance Italy’s books are rooted  firmly in a eurozone system which many argue is being steered by  Berlin.

RT: It was a turbulent night in Rome. Can we expect to  see even more unrest?

James Walston: We are seeing more this morning. This  morning the protesters have camped outside one of the gates of  Rome – ironically, where the Italians came to conquer Rome from  the Popes in 1870. And today, of course, it’s a major traffic hub  and on a Sunday it doesn’t matter too much, but the traffic  around the center of the city is blocked, because they are  protesting and camping there, and say they want to mobilize the  city. So this is going on, and will probably go on in different  ways for a long time now.

RT: So is the government going to review this unpopular  budget that actually triggered such public discontent?

JW: Well, the budget was published on the 15th, – a few  days ago – and it will be passed (as) this was the proposal from  the government. It has to be passed by the end of the year; it’s  going to be modified anyway. And the government has not yet said  how it’s going to modify the budget. But so many people – from  the employers to the trade unions to different political parties   – and now very strong protests from young people of various sorts  who said ‘We do not like the government, we don’t like the  budget. We want a recovery budget, we want a growth budget.’ This  is what they’re complaining about. They’re complaining about the  same thing as the employers. It’s an unusual situation, but  that’s what we have.