Genetically modified polio virus being redeployed as a cancer treatment… FDA pushing for quick approval… what could possibly go wrong?

(NaturalNews) An experimental cancer treatment has been given “breakthrough” status by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but is it really a “miracle drug,” as portrayed by the mainstream media?

The treatment, which uses a genetically-altered version of the polio virus to fight cancer cells, has been given fast track status for Phase 2 trials. If the Phase 2 trials are successful, Phase 3 testing may not be required, and a drug based on the treatment could be made available within a few years.

Phase 1 trials of the treatment on an aggressive form of brain cancer called glioblastoma were successful enough to give many people hope that a revolutionary new cancer-fighting weapon might be on the horizon

Read more at:

http://www.naturalnews.com/054149_polio_virus_cancer_drug_miracle_breakthrough.html

Navy SEALs cite shabby treatment as Team Obama helps Hollywood instead

Navy SEALs cite shabby treatment as Team Obama helps Hollywood instead

Navy SEALs are the toast of America, but revelations show that the top brass has not always watched their backs during the Obama administration.

SEALs have brought exhilarating moments for the White House. The storied SEAL Team 6 killed Osama bin Laden in Pakistan in 2011 and rescued U.S. cargo ship captain Richard Phillips from Somali pirates in 2009. Hollywood transformed both operations into blockbuster movies — with the administration’s help

But some in the special operations community cite shabby treatment.

A book by Billy Vaughn, father of a SEAL killed in the Aug. 6, 2011, shootdown of a Chinook helicopter in Afghanistan, blames the administration for leaking too much information about his son’s unit.

Another book by two former SEALs tells the “shameful ordeal” they endured based on allegations of prisoner abuse by one unreliable sailor and one determined terrorist. Instead of issuing gratitude for nabbing the “butcher of Fallujah” in Iraq in 2009, U.S. Central Command court-martialed the SEALs on felony charges.

The two authors and a third SEAL were acquitted by military juries when the prosecution’s case fall apart.

One of those former SEALs, Matthew McCabe, said in an interview that the ordeal encouraged him to leave the Navy last year rather than try out for Team 6 as he had planned.

“At that point, I really was thinking, ‘We gave a lot to be in this position. And for the minor allegation we’re being accused of, for you to turn your back on us that quick, I’m not going to give any more,’” said Mr. McCabe, now a commodities analyst in Houston. “I’m done with what’s going on. Should I go to work every day and give 1,000 percent if at the drop of a dime someone is going to stab me in the back? I’m not going to do that.”