The flu vaccine may have a strange problem that US scientists can’t fix

Getting a flu shot every year? More may not be better
If you’ve been diligent about getting your flu shot every year, you may not want to read this. But a growing body of evidence indicates that more may not always be better.
The evidence, which is confounding some researchers, suggests that getting flu shots repeatedly can gradually reduce the effectiveness of the vaccines under some circumstances.
That finding is worrying public health officials in the US, who have been urging everyone to get a flu shot each year — and who still believe an annual vaccination is better than skipping the vaccines altogether.

The flu vaccine may have a strange problem that US scientists can’t fix
researchers are concerned about what appears to be a troubling trend: Repeated vaccinations against the flu might make the newest shot less effective than the last, Helen Branswell reports at Stat.
When researchers followed 328 households during the 2010-2011 flu season, they found — much to their surprise — that the only people who really seemed to benefit from immunization were the ones who hadn’t gotten a flu shot the year before. These “unexpected findings … require further study,” the researchers wrote, in 2013.
A larger and more robust study, published last year in Clinical Infectious Diseases, added more evidence that the 2013 study was onto something important. Researchers followed more than 7,000 people for eight yearly flu seasons, and they learned people got the strongest protection against the flu only when they were vaccinated for the current season — and at no other time during the previous five years.

Woman dies of sepsis after getting flu shot; CDC claims it as flu death, urges public to get vaccinated
(NaturalNews) A Wisconsin radiology technician who was recently forced by her employer to get a flu shot died just days later after contracting sepsis, according to reports. Katie McQuestion, a 26-year-old from Kenosha, reportedly took the jab in compliance with her hospital’s demands, resulting in a rapid progression from good health to severe illness to gruesome death.
Almost immediately after getting a flu shot, Katie began to feel ill with the flu, she initially reported to her loved ones. The otherwise healthy, spry young woman who had no previous medical conditions suddenly developed flu-like symptoms during a trip out to shop for dresses with her mother on December 29. Katie was engaged to be married.
“She was the picture of health,” stated the girl’s mother, who wished to remain anonymous, to ABC News. “No 29-year-old should have to bury his wife,” she added in reference to McQuestion’s fiancee.
Katie told her mother flu shot made her sicker than she had ever been
One day after visiting the dress shop, Katie was sent home from work because her condition was worsening. On the following day, New Year’s Eve, Katie’s mother went to pick up a prescription for her, which didn’t help any as Katie’s health declined ever-further.

OECD chief urges banks to lend more

OECD Secretary General Angel Guirra met with MEPs on Tuesday to share his outlook for Europe’s…

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OECD Secretary General Angel Guirra met with MEPs on Tuesday to share his outlook for Europe’s economy.

The OECD sees eurozone growth of 1 percent next year, hitting 1.6 percent in 2015.

Gurria told that banks need to increase lending to homes and businesses to fire up European growth once more.

“It’s not enough that the banks don’t go bankrupt.They have to lend. The problem is that they are not lending,” he told euronews’ Efi Koutsokosta.

“Governments can help by providing some guarantees maybe, some incentives, by sharing some of the initial losses.”

The former Mexican finance minister will be in the Greek capital of Athens on Wednesday when the OECD will unveil its latest report on the country’s economy.

Mr Gurria told euronews: A country like Greece which is not yet out of the programme is vulnerable and needs support. There’s work to be done in terms of collecting taxes and privatization. There’s work to be done in the fundamental elements of competitiveness, in education, innovation issues.”

Greece’s debt pile currently stands at 175.5 percent of GDP.