The Tetanus PUSH

The Tetanus PUSH
Author: Becky Hastings, wife, mother, grandmother, passionate follower of Jesus and truth. As a breastfeeding counsellor for over 23 years Becky is devoted to helping parents make wise decisions for the long-term health and wellbeing of their babies. As a member of a Vaccine Safety Education Coalition, Becky writes and speaks on the topic of vaccine safety.
A child falls and cuts themselves on a fairly clean object. A parent takes them to the ER or Urgent Care for stitches. The staff ask if they are up-to-date on vaccines, and then PUSH hard to give a “tetanus” shot. Parent declines, and the staff threatens to call CPS or a social worker.
If you ever find yourself in this situation, this is what you need to know:
Tetanus bacteria, known as Clostridium tetani, is an anaerobic bacteria, meaning it can’t survive in oxygenated environments. If the wound being treated is bleeding, or has bled, there is extremely low likelihood of tetanus infection.
Just because you get cut on metal (rusty or not) it doesn’t automatically mean there is tetanus bacteria present. Tetanus is primarily found in soil or manure.
Even if there was a deep puncture wound that did not bleed that was caused by an object that had tetanus bacteria on it, giving a tetanus vaccination AFTER the exposure is of no value. The vaccine is not an “instant tetanus killer”; it is well known that the tetanus vaccine takes about two weeks for the body to produce antibodies against tetanus. Giving a ‘tetanus shot’ after an injury provides no benefit.
If there were serious concerns about tetanus exposure (a deep non bleeding wound in a farm-like environment with a lot of exposure to manure) then the ONLY thing that could help (other than allowing the wound to bleed, if possible, and cleaning the wound with soap and water or hydrogen peroxide) would be the TiG shot (tetanus immunoglobulin) which is an anti-toxin, not a vaccine.
There is no ‘tetanus only’ vaccine available in the United States. When you are offered a ‘tetanus shot’ in an ER or by the doctor, they will administer either the DTaP or TDaP, depending on your age; a 3 in 1 cocktail vaccine consisting of Diphtheria, Tetanus & Pertussis (whooping cough) bacteria, and up to 625 mcg of aluminum.

DTaP vaccine insert:
Adverse events reported during post-approval use of Tripedia vaccine include idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, SIDS, anaphylactic reaction, cellulitis, autism, convulsion/grand mal convulsion, encephalopathy, hypotonia, neuropathy, somnolence and apnea. Events were included in this list because of the seriousness or frequency of reporting. Because these events are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequencies or to establish a causal relationship to components of Tripedia vaccine

1991 Government Document Confirms Tdap Vaccine Causes Microcephaly
The study, Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines: A Report of the Committee to Review the Adverse Consequences of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines, found a link between microcephaly and the Tdap vaccine.
The following, written by Sean Adl-Tabatabai, sums up the findings of the research:
Among symptomatic cases, presumed causes are frequently grouped according to the timing of the suspected insult as occurring pre-, peri-, or postnatally. Prenatal factors are thought to account for 20 to 30 percent of cases.
The category includes cerebral anomalies, chromosomal disorders, neurocutaneous syndromes such as tuberous sclerosis, inherited metabolic disorders, intrauterine infections, family history of seizures, and microcephaly (Bobele and Bodensteiner, 1990; Kurokawa et al., 1980; Ohtahara, 1984; Riikonen and Donner, 1979).
One of the earliest reports suggesting a possible link between infantile spasms and pertussis immunization are those of Baird and Borofsky (1957).
24 children who had hypsarrhythmia and infantile myoclonic seizures and whose development prior to the onset of spasms was apparently normal were described in the case. Nine cases of infantile spasms were reported to have occurred between 1 and 5 days after DPT vaccination.

Adverse Effects of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines (1991)
Description
Parents have come to depend on vaccines to protect their children from a variety of diseases. Some evidence suggests, however, that vaccination against pertussis (whooping cough) and rubella (German measles) is, in a small number of cases, associated with increased risk of serious illness.
This book examines the controversy over the evidence and offers a comprehensively documented assessment of the risk of illness following immunization with vaccines against pertussis and rubella. Based on extensive review of the evidence from epidemiologic studies, case histories, studies in animals, and other sources of information, the book examines:
The relation of pertussis vaccines to a number of serious adverse events, including encephalopathy and other central nervous system disorders, sudden infant death syndrome, autism, Guillain-Barre syndrome, learning disabilities, and Reye syndrome.
The relation of rubella vaccines to arthritis, various neuropathies, and thrombocytopenic purpura.
The volume, which includes a description of the committee’s methods for evaluating evidence and directions for future research, will be important reading for public health officials, pediatricians, researchers, and concerned parents.

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